Department of Language and Linguistic Science

University | A to Z | Departments

  • Language and Linguistic Science

Postgraduate study

  • Language and Linguistic Science home
  • For current students
  • Staff area (login required)
  • Undergraduate study
  • Frequently asked questions
  • Taught Masters
  • MA in Linguistics by Research
  • How to apply
  • Fees and funding
  • Student profiles
  • PhD Programmes
  • Languages at York
  • CPD courses
  • Language Teaching Forum
  • Visiting scholars
  • For schools
  • News and events
  • You said, we did
  • Equality and Diversity
  • Contact and find us

We are one of the leading centres in the UK for teaching and research in theoretical and empirical linguistics. Our major specialisms are in theoretical syntax and semantics, phonetics and phonology, language acquisition, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, historical linguistics and forensic speech science. All of our taught postgraduate programmes involve three terms of coursework and a dissertation.

Our taught MAs We offer MA programmes for those who are new to the field or have only minimal prior background: MA in Linguistics MA in Applied Linguistics MA in Psycholinguistics and specialist MA programmes for those with considerable prior background: Linguistics (MSc) Forensic Speech Science (MSc) Psycholinguistics (MA) Interpreting, Translation and Applied Technologies (MA) The MA in Psycholinguistics has routes for those with minimal prior background and those who already have a more extensive background in the area.
MA by research If you already have a worked-out proposal for a one-year linguistic research project, the  MA in Linguistics by Research  may be a good route for you.

MA programmes in linguistics

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HAiZyLMAkY

Our PhD programmes We offer three different PhD programmes: PhD in Linguistics , for applicants wishing to work in the following research areas: Phonetics and phonology Syntax and semantics Sociolinguistics including language variation and change Forensic speech science PhD in Psycholinguistics , in collaboration with the Departments of Psychology and Education. PhD in Language and Communication , in collaboration with the Departments of Education, and Sociology. We can also supervise students on the PhD in Applied Linguistics run by the Department of Education The registration period for a PhD is three years full-time and six years part-time.  For an initial discussion about the possibility to pursue a PhD in our Department, please fill in the doctoral enquiry  form  and we will contact you as soon as possible.
Postgraduate study at York Recent MA/MSc dissertations Recent PhD dissertations Online Open Days Student profiles Postgraduate prospectus Fees and funding

Department of Language and Linguistic Science University of York , York , YO10 5DD , UK Tel: work +44 (0)1904 322650 | [email protected]

Legal statements | Privacy | Cookies | Accessibility © University of York | Modify | Direct Edit

Simon Fraser University Engaging the World

Department of linguistics.

  • A-Z directory

phd linguistics york

Support the Department of Linguistics 

Lauren Schneider PhD Defence (6000 x 4000 px) - 1

phd defence

Phd defence: lauren schneider.

Please join us for Lauren Schneider’s PhD defence on Wednesday, July 31, 9:00am – 12:00pm. The defence will take place in Room 7402 of Robert C. Brown Hall, SFU Burnaby Campus. Lauren’s work, titled Serial verb constructions in Hul’q’umi’num’ Salish , presents an account of Hul’q’umi’num’ Salish constructions in which multiple verbal elements are stacked together. She examines the use of these serial verb constructions (SVCs) in great detail, including a survey of the various word orders available and the limits of SVC flexibility in Hul’q’umi’num’ Salish.

Serial verb constructions (SVCs) are an understudied phenomena in Salish languages. Hul’q’umi’num’ is the Vancouver Island dialect of Halkomelem Salish and this language makes frequent use of SVCs in narratives. Using data from elicitations and a corpus of texts, I present an account of constructions in which multiple verbal elements are stacked together. I begin by reviewing the relevant literature in SVC typology, Salish language syntax, motion semantics, discourse strategies, etc.

I examine in greater detail the use of SVCs to encode motion semantics, paying particular attention to the order of the verbs. During this study, I found two patterns of grammaticalization of verbs that are likely moving toward dependent verb forms. The first is the verb huye’ ‘leave’ which is serialized more often than any other verb and exhibits a strong preference for occurring as the first verb; this verb is in the process of becoming an auxiliary. The second is the verb nem’ ‘go’ which frequently occurs as the end of a serial string to introduce goal or location information; this verb is in the process of developing coverb function.

Hul’q’umi’num’ SVCs can be composed of any combination of intransitive and transitive verbs. I survey the various word orders available to these constructions and probe the limits of their flexibility. Next, I expand the scope of my examination to the entire oral paragraph, revealing how the discourse context plays a significant role in the realization of the syntax of SVCs. Finally, I conduct a preliminary survey of serialization and alternative patterns in the other Salish languages.

Committee Members

  • Dr. Donna Gerdts, Supervisor and Professor SFU
  • Dr. Nancy Hedberg, Professor SFU
  • Dr. Réjean Canac-Marquis, Associate Professor SFU
  • Dr. Daisy Rosenblum, Assistant Professor, UBC 

York University

Linguistics

Bachelor of Arts (BA) - Honours

Are you fascinated by language?

Learn how language is naturally organized. Investigate sound and word patterns, sentence structure, syntax and language usage. Discover how children acquire language without formal instruction. Dive into the relationship between language and the mind–what happens in our brains when we speak.

Our program focuses on sociolinguistics, the study of how different social contexts affect our language, convey social meanings and reflect aspects of our identity. This program offers a social and cultural perspective on almost every aspect of the humanities and social sciences. Other core areas of linguistics have strong links to math, logic, teaching, speech-language pathology, and the applied sciences of communication engineering and computer science.

Our program allows you to choose from courses that represent the widest selection of languages from any Canadian university. In our small classes, you’ll build lasting academic relationships with your professors and peers.

Quick Links

  • LA&PS Colleges
  • Peer Support
  • YorkU Libraries
  • Our Faculty
  • Working Papers (e-journal)

Are you a future student?

OUAC Code: YFN

What you’ll learn

  • Think critically and analytically in order to make insightful observations and hypotheses, and draw scientific conclusions.
  • Learn about the relationships, similarities and differences between various language groups and dialects.
  • Gain an appreciation for the complexity of language, how it is acquired and how it develops from childhood to adulthood.

Hands-on experiences

  • In your fourth year, you’ll have the opportunity to do independent linguistic field work on a language you have not been previously exposed to by interacting with a native speaker consultant in the classroom.
  • Our Department holds a Lecture Series and hosts events and conferences such as the Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages.

phd linguistics york

Upcoming Events

The program here at York is special for a number of reasons. We provide a strong basis in areas such as phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax, and also offer thorough examinations of sociolinguistics and experimental linguistics. Our students develop the ability to look at linguistics from all different angles.

— Liisa Duncan Assistant Professor, Linguistics

students at yorku campus study space

March 10, 2016 2019 Montréal-Ottawa-Toronto (MOT) Phonology/Phonetics Workshop: Friday, March 29, 2019, at York University

yorku vari hall

March 10, 2016 DLLL hosted the 48th Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages (April 2018)

student browsing books in library

March 10, 2016 Congratulations to DLLL Professors on their recent book publications

Book cover for The Hyphen: And Other Thoughts From the In-Between

April 30, 2024 LA&PS Professor and Associate Dean, Maria João Maciel Jorge, releases new book of essays delving into cultural heritage and hyphenated identity

Cover of the book Reconstructions of Canadian Identity

April 25, 2024 Professor Maria João Maciel Jorge and alumnus Vander Tavares highlight lived experiences of marginalized Canadians in new, co-edited book

lazarillo de tormes book cover

January 9, 2024 2023-2024 Spanish Speakers Series - January 24th, 2024

male and female student in front of dahdaleh building on keele campus

Connect with LA&PS

  • Department of Linguistics >
  • Graduate >

PhD in Linguistics

Alumnus Dr. Dawei Jin, now Assistant Professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Dawei Jin, presenting a conference paper (now an Assistant Professor Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)

The mission of the department’s PhD program is to train students to do research in linguistics and produce research that reflects the values and the mission of the department as a whole, to prepare them for academic jobs at teaching universities, liberal arts colleges, or major research universities and for jobs outside of academia. Our goal is to ensure that all of our students have at the end of their study an academic or industry position that requires a PhD in Linguistics. Our doctoral degree track focuses on breadth and empirical/experimental methodologies. Students receive training in traditional disciplines such as syntax, semantics, pragmatics, phonetics and phonology, and they may also receive substantial training in other areas, such as language typology, psycholinguistics, computational linguistics, and historical and contact linguistics. All of our students are required to take at least two semesters of Methods classes, which include courses in Field Methods, Quantitative Methods and Statistics, Corpus Linguistics and Computational Linguistics. Our students are also encouraged to explore interdisciplinary research within the UB Center for Cognitive Science , and many of our students receive extensive training in Cognitive Science through collaborations with the Psychology or Computer Science departments. 

PhD Funding

Join a community of scholars and researchers working together to solve pressing global problems. 

We are committed to recruiting the very best PhD students and preparing doctoral students for career success. UB features:

  • World-class faculty experts  mentor PhD students in a dynamic research and learning environment. Students can focus on their research and scholarship alongside renowned faculty while preparing for the careers and professions that await them after graduation.
  • A city on the rise.  Buffalo, N.Y. offers affordable housing, arts, culture and community. Learn more about Buffalo .

PhD Funding Opportunities

  • Academic year stipends of $23,000  for all full-time, funded PhD students on 10-month academic teaching assistant, research assistant or graduate assistant appointments.
  • UB’s stipend levels are competitive among public Association of American Universities (AAU) member institutions.
  • Arthur A. Schomburg Fellowship Program : To be eligible for a Schomburg Fellowship, candidates must contribute to the diversity of the student body, and can demonstrate that they have overcome a disadvantage or other impediment to success in higher education. Only U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to receive Schomburg Fellowships.
  • Presidential Fellowships :  To be eligible for Presidential Fellowships, candidates must meet the criteria listed on the Presidential Fellowship page. Both domestic and international students are eligible, if they meet these criteria. For any questions regarding funding for academic year 2025–2026, contact the director of graduate studies or department chair.

Application Deadlines

December 15:  All PhD applicants wishing to be considered for financial support

March 1:  All other international PhD applicants

April 1:  All other domestic PhD applicants

Online Application

Degree requirements.

                                        
(Students with substantial prior preparation in linguistics choose one core course in each of the areas of: (1) Phonetics/Phonology;(2) Morphosyntax; (3) Semantics – plus a fourth course in their desired area of specialization; students without substantial prior preparation take two core courses in each area.)  

For most students with no transfer credits from other institutions, the categories in the table above should account for 48 of the 72 credits required for the Ph.D. The remaining 24 credits can be Independent Study, thesis/dissertation guidance or up to 12 credits from other UB departments. (Students in the Cognitive Science track and those earning a concurrent M.S. in Computational Linguistics may be permitted to take additional courses in other departments in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies.)

*Students should consult the Director of Graduate Studies to determine which Methods courses are more appropriate given their intended specializations.

Areas of Specialization

PhD students are required to take four courses in their main specialty (including relevant core and methods courses), and are expected to choose their two methods courses in accordance with their specialization. Students need not choose their area of specialization early in their graduate career; faculty only expect that students take these four courses by the time they finish their course work (i.e., complete their 72 credit hours).

Students admitted to the PhD track who decide, during the first or second year, that they no longer wish to pursue a PhD, may instead complete the course requirements for the MA specialization and take the MA exam.

Specializations and Applicable Courses

This list of courses is intended only as a guideline, and additional classes may be added to these lists upon approval by the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS). Please also note that some courses are more frequently taught than others. Students should contact the DGS to inquire about future course scheduling. 

Phonology practicum (LIN 502)

Phonetics (LIN 531)

Phonology I (LIN 532)

Phonology II (LIN 533)

Historical Linguistics (LIN 539)

Acquisition of Phonology (LIN 556)

Prosodic analysis of natural discourse (LIN 558)

Advanced seminar in Phonology (LIN 612)

Advanced Phonetics (LIN 670)

Morphology (LIN 510)

Syntax I (LIN 515)

Typology and Universals (LIN 525)

Syntax II (LIN 535)

The Syntax of Romance (LIN 537)

Discourse and Syntax (LIN 604)

Approaches to the Lexicon (LIN 608)

Current syntactic theory (LIN 614)

Advanced Morphology (LIN 616)

Role and Reference grammar (LIN 625)

Functional morphosyntax (LIN 626)

Structure of a non-Indo-European language (LIN 630)

Linguistic description of an American language (LIN 631-633)

Discourse pragmatics (LIN 504)

Meaning and communicative behaviors (LIN 506)

Conversational analysis (LIN 507)

Linguistic Anthropology (LIN 521)

Semantics I (LIN 538)

Semantics II (LIN 543)

Formal semantics (LIN 548)

Introduction to cognitive linguistics (LIN 580)

Cognitive foundations of language (LIN 581)

Language and cognition (LIN 582)

Empirical semantics (LIN 606)

Semantics of space, time, and force (LIN 636)

Cognitive structure of language (LIN 637)

Advanced discourse analysis (LIN 723)

Corpus linguistics (LIN 514)

Psycholinguistics (LIN 517)

Language acquisition (LIN 555)

Neurolinguistics (LIN 592)

Cross-linguistic study of language development (LIN 603)

Topics in psycholinguistics (LIN 641)

*Psycholinguistics and Neurolinguistics are highly interdisciplinary and may involve substantial work in other departments.

Qualifying Paper

The qualifying paper (QP) is required of students who have been admitted to the Doctoral program in the Department of Linguistics. It must be completed before the student can pass on to Phase 2 of the program (i.e., the phase during which students conduct their PhD thesis research). The QP is intended to give the student experience in carrying out a research project that goes beyond what is normally required of a course paper; however the project certainly can evolve out of a course paper. The paper should have the format of a journal submission, and be between 9,000 and 12,000 words in length.

Early in their second year of graduate study, the student should choose a faculty member who will advise the student while he or she is working on the QP. (The faculty member may be, but does not have to be, the same faculty who will direct the student’s dissertation.) The role of the advisor is to guide the student as he or she is carrying out the research and the writing. The student, together with the advisor, select a second committee member (or “reader”), who will read and comment on the QP.

Once the QP has been approved by the advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies will assign a third committee member (or “reader”), and the other members of the QP committee will then read the QP and provide feedback or simply approve the paper if no additional revisions are necessary. When the committee has approved the QP, the three faculty sign the approval form. Students return the form to the Director of Graduate Study after all three faculty have signed the form, and (s)he will also sign it. Finally, the form is sent to the graduate secretary, so that (s)he can enter the information into our student database and file the form in the student’s file.

Students are required to make an oral presentation of their QP research at the end of their fifth semester (at the latest), and to finish their QP by the end of the sixth semester (at the latest). Upon completion of a student’s QP, the faculty as a whole will either determine whether (s)he should passed onto Phase 2 of the PhD program. In the event a student is not passed onto the P.D phase of the program, (s)he will earn a terminal MA and will leave the program.

Dissertation Proposal

The dissertation proposal is not intended to be a paper in the same sense as the QP. Rather, the dissertation proposal should be viewed as a very long abstract. It should include a statement of the topic (or hypothesis/claim); the context for the research (Why should other linguists be interested in the research? How does it fit into previous research?); the methodology and nature of the data or evidence that the student hopes to collect or find; and, perhaps, a preview of the conclusions the student hopes to present or the contribution the dissertation will make. Generally, the proposal should not be any longer than 20 pages; however the dissertation advisor ultimately determines the form of the proposal.

Dissertation Proposal Defense

The proposal defense is simply a meeting of the committee members and the student to ensure that everyone is clear about the nature of the topic, the scope of the research, and the methodology. Typically, no one “fails” a proposal defense, since the primary goal is to clarify and comment on the research before the research begins. The student should be aware, however, that the proposal defense may result in significant changes in the research plan.

Once the proposal defense has taken place, the committee members sign the form, the form is returned to the Director of Graduate Studies to sign, and finally the form is sent to the Assistant to the Chair.

David Fertig.

638 Baldy Hall

Phone: (716) 645-0129

[email protected]

DiCanio, Christian.

601 Baldy Hall

Phone: (716) 645-0113

[email protected]

phd linguistics york

Graduate Program

The curriculum is designed to assure that Ph.D. students receive an adequate grounding in all of the fundamental areas of linguistics, while leaving them the freedom they need to become independent researchers. The first year is devoted to coursework, which gives students a strong foundation and enables them to quickly begin contributing to the research life of the department. Beyond the core, students are relatively free to design their own program of study both within the discipline and across disciplines, within a framework of requirements set by the field and the Graduate School.

This program is organized in consultation with a Special Committee of the student’s own choosing. Committee members represent the student's major and minor subjects. Minors may be chosen from disciplines other than linguistics, so that it is possible, for example, for a Ph.D. student to major in General Linguistics and minor in such areas as Computer Science, Latin American Studies or Cognitive Science. The Special Committee system makes the Ph.D. program maximally flexible and allows students to avail themselves of the entire university's resources. 

Note on M.A. Program:

We do not offer a Master's program. The exception is through the Employee Degree Program (a benefit for Cornell employees). Contact Shai Wiesel, our Graduate Field Assistant, for more information ( [email protected]  or 607-255-1105)

ADMISSIONS REVIEW CONSIDERING COVID-19 DISRUPTIONS

APPLICATION DEADLINE: December 15 (of each year - fall admission only)

Application Requirements

Applicants must have a B.A., B.S. or M.A. degree.

Submitted online:

  • Online application found at www.gradschool.cornell.edu/admissions
  • Academic statement of purpose
  • Personal statement
  • One research paper as a writing sample
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Application fee: $105
  • TOEFL or ILETS scores also required.  For exact details of how to satisfy the English Language Proficiency, please see   https://gradschool.cornell.edu/admissions/prepare/english-language-proficiency-requirement/ .

*The GRE is not required for admission to the Field of Linguistics.

All materials must be uploaded to CollegeNet (see application link above). No hard copy application materials are accepted.

Requests for further information should be addressed to Shai Wiesel: E-mail : [email protected] Phone : (607) 255-1105 Notification of Application Status: If any material is missing from your application, you will be notified by email.  Check the status of your application and select "review your activity".

Application and Admission Timeline

December 15 – All application materials are due.

Early February - Applicants are informed of admissions decisions and financial awards by this time. 

April 15 – Admitted students are required to accept or decline their offers by this date.

FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions 

- What are the strengths of your program? At Cornell, linguistic theory is applied to a broad range of linguistic evidence and tools, augmenting traditional linguistic intuitions. These include experimental/instrumental approaches, corpora, computational methods, and language documentation.

- What are the research interests and theoretical orientation of your faculty? Take a look at our  faculty webpages ! Our faculty cover a wide range of interests within the field of linguistics.

- How long does it take to complete the Ph.D. in Linguistics? Most students take five years. Finishing in this amount of time is contingent on timely completion of the required coursework and the A-exam.

- Can I do a Master's in Linguistics at Cornell University? No. Our program is designed to train students for the Ph.D.

- Can I start the program in the Winter or Spring semester? No. Our program's coursework is designed to start in the fall semester.

- What kinds of jobs do students who receive the Ph.D. in Linguistics have? Our students are successful in obtaining various academic and non-academic positions . See our " MA/PhD Alumni " page for information on the placement of our Ph.D graduates.

- What if I cannot afford the application fee? Please refer to this information from the Cornell University Graduate School: Application fee waivers: Check fee waiver eligibility requirements online before applying . If you are eligible, you can find a link to our fee waiver request form on the payment page of the online application form. You must submit your application and the fee waiver request at the same time. We review fee waiver requests every business day.

- What are the tuition costs? The tuition cost set for the 2023-24 academic year is $24,800. More detailed information on tuition & stipend rates and other fees (student activity fee and health insurance).

- What financial aid is available? Are international students eligible for financial aid? Two types of financial support are available through Cornell: merit-based (fellowships, assistantships, and tuition awards) and need-based (loans). Please visit our " Financial Support " section below for more information. Unless you choose otherwise, students are considered for merit-based aid, regardless of citizenship, as part of the admissions process—no special application is required. Applicants are notified of merit-based awards at the same time admissions offers are made. You must notify the Graduate School by April 15 if you plan to accept the offer.

- What does the admissions committee look for when reviewing applications? Simply stated, we are looking for talented students who are a good match for our program.

- How many students are accepted to the program per admission cycle? Our target class size is six. 

- What do my GRE scores and GPA have to be? We do not set specific minimums for GRE scores and GPA. GREs and GPA are only one consideration in evaluating applications for admission.

- Who should my letters of recommendation come from? Generally, academic references are from professors you have worked with during your undergraduate or master’s program. If you are not coming straight out of an academic program, these may also include references from your employers. Simply put, we are looking for letters from people who know both the applicant and our program and can tell us that the applicant will do well in our program.

- What should I include in my statement of purpose? A statement of purpose should be a well-written statement (of about 2 pages in length) that tells us why you have chosen to pursue linguistics as a field of study and why you have chosen to apply to Cornell. It should include your reasons for undertaking graduate work and an explanation of your academic interests, including their relation to your undergraduate study and professional goals. If possible, include the names of the Cornell faculty members whose research seems to match your own interests, and briefly discuss the connections you see. Also describe your relevant research experience, and note any publications you have authored or co-authored

Ph.D. Requirements

Progress towards the degree is attained by

  • Completing the core course requirements
  • Passing the Qualifying Exam (Q-exam), results reported to Field
  • Passing the Admission to Candidacy Exam (A-exam), results reported to Grad School (form A4)
  • Defending the prospectus (P-exam), results reported to Field
  • Completing and defending dissertation (B-exam), results reported to Grad School (form A4)

Brief Ph.D Progress Checklist (For details on the requirements, see below. Italicized items are new Graduate School policies that apply to students beginning with those admitted for Fall 2014.)

1st year: 

  • Apply for an NSF or other national fellowship in the fall semester, if eligible (usually only US citizens and resident aliens are eligible). 
  • Make significant inroads on completing the core courses 
  • Have two meetings (one per semester) with your Advisory Committee
  • File academic plan with Graduate School describing anticipated summer activities and outcomes (due May 1, required for summer funding)

Select a Special Committee for your Q-paper by September 1st

  • Submit a Q-paper proposal to your Special Committee by December 1st

Continue taking core courses, seminars

Complete any ancillary skills courses your committee requires (if any)

  • Take Research Workshop (LING 6603) in spring

Take Q-Exam, committee reports results to GFA

The Q-Exam should be attempted before the end of the 4th semester. Summer funding for the second summer will be contingent on having attempted the Q-Exam by this deadline. To qualify for summer funding at the end of the fourth semester, it is essential that you schedule your Q-Exam no later than May 1st, and that the date of the exam be no later than May 14th.

  • File academic plan with Graduate School describing anticipated summer activities and outcomes (due May 1, required for summer funding)​
  • Select a Special Committee for your A-paper by September 1st
  • Submit an A-paper proposal to your Special Committee by December 1st

Take Research Workshop (LING 6604) in fall semester

Take seminars to further research goals

Schedule A-Exam (form A3)

Take A-exam (report results with form A4, eligibility for 3rd summer funding is contingent on passing A-exam or filing a scheduling form indicating an intention to take the exam for the start of the 7th semester)

N.B. The dissertation-year fellowship will be available only to students who attempted their A-exam prior to the seventh semester of enrollment (a requirement of the Code of Legislation) and have passed the A-exam. In addition, students seeking the dissertation-year fellowship must have written and submitted an external fellowship or grant proposal within their first four years of enrollment, to encourage all students to pursue external funding. (In exceptional cases for which there may be no logical external funding organization to which it would be appropriate to write a proposal, the student may write a proposal for an internal Cornell award such as a Graduate School or Einaudi travel grant or may petition for permission to complete an alternative professionalization activity.)

  • A-exam should be done by the beginning of the 7th semester!
  • Select Special Committee for your dissertation by September 1st
  • Write your dissertation proposal
  • Take P-Exam (defense of prospectus) by end of fall semester, committee reports results to GFA
  • Work on dissertation
  • Apply for dissertation year fellowships (usually done in fall) and other post-A-exam funding
  • 4th year summer funding is available by application only; students who have not passed their A-exam are not eligible. Applications for summer funding are due May 1 at the Graduate School.

 5th year:

  • Apply for jobs, postdocs, etc.
  • Finish dissertation
  • Schedule B-Exam (form A3)
  • Take B-exam (defense of dissertation, report results with form A4)
  • File Thesis, using Graduation Manager

Course Requirements

A. core courses.

To assure that Ph.D. students receive an adequate grounding in all of the fundamental areas of linguistics, the field has defined a set of core requirements in the areas of Syntax, Phonology, Semantics and Historical Linguistics. The general expectation is that all students will take all core courses. If a student requests an exemption on the basis of comparable graduate-level coursework at another institution, this exemption can only be granted after consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies and the instructor of the relevant course. Beyond the core courses, Ph.D. students are expected to attend advanced linguistics courses (topics courses and seminars) not only in the areas in which they write their research papers and thesis but in areas that will provide sufficient breadth as advised by the Special Committee.  

Students are required to complete courses equivalent to the following: 

  • Historical Linguistics (LING 6314)
  • Phonology I and II (LING 6401/6402)
  • Syntax I and II  (LING 6403/6404)
  • Semantics I (LING 6421)
  • Research Workshops (LING 6603/6604): This course provides students with an opportunity to develop an original research paper through a number of revisions, some of which are presented to an audience of fellow students. The final version is presented at a semester-end conference.  Offered both fall and spring.
  • At least one course from the following subfields:  computational linguistics, historical linguistics (beyond Ling 6314), morphology, phonetics, semantics and pragmatics.
  • Advanced courses: all students are required to take at least four (4) seminars or topics courses for credit. These are courses at the 6600-level or higher. 

B. Ancillary skill sets

In the course of research a student may need to master one or more ancillary skill sets. These might be familiarity with languages of scholarship or training in statistics, logic, field methods or programming. The student, in consultation with his/her committee, is expected to determine which skills need to be acquired and how and when this should be done.

Q- and A-Exams (admission to candidacy):

Admission to candidacy in the field of Linguistics consists of writing two research papers which are evaluated in two exams, the Q-exam and the A-exam.  The Q-exam is taken by the end of the second year, and the A-exam is taken by the end of the third year.  Graduate School regulations require that all doctoral students must take the Examination for Admission to Candidacy before beginning their seventh semester of registration unless special permission is obtained from the Dean.  The format of the Q- and A-exams varies from case to case, depending on the expectations of the Special Committee.  The Field requires that the candidate submit to the committee in advance of the exam a research paper of high quality (see the deadlines above).  The papers for the two exams must be in two distinct subfields, with a distinct Special Committee devoted to each paper.  The Special Committee for each exam will normally ask the candidate to prepare written answers for one to two questions.    

P-Exam (defense of prospectus):

Following successful completion of the A-exam, a Special Committee for the dissertation is selected and the P-exam is undertaken by the fall of the fourth year.    

B-Exam (thesis defense):

The B-Exam is taken after completion of the Ph.D. dissertation.  The B-Exam includes a presentation of the highlights of the dissertation followed by questions from the committee and others in attendance. 

Financial Support

We typically offer guaranteed five-year full financial support to students we admit into the graduate program, regardless of the student's citizenship. Two of those years (SAGE Fellowship: the first-year and the "dissertation year" in which students are not expected to work as a Teaching Assistant or Research Assistant) are through fellowships, and the other three years are through other sources of support, typically teaching assistantships or research assistantships. The five year funding package covers: tuition and fees, student health insurance and a nine-month stipend for living expenses. Funding is contingent on satisfactory academic performance, and beginning with the 2014-15 academic year, the Graduate School has instituted progress requirements for continued funding.

Teaching/Research Assistantships

The studies of all graduate students are funded in part by Teaching Assistantships (TA). In the Department of Linguistics, most Teaching Assistantships involve helping a professor in an undergraduate course; responsibilities may include leading discussion sections, meeting with students, helping grade papers and exams. Every effort is made to match teaching assignments with graduate student interests and to make sure that each Teaching Assistant receives a variety of teaching experiences while at Cornell. Teaching assistants work on average 15 hours per week and do not usually exceed 20 hours in any given week.

A student holding a TA-ship may work total of 20 hours per week as a combination of the TA responsibilities and employment elsewhere, either on- or off-campus.  Students holding a University fellowship, external fellowship, or GRA may also be employed on- or off-campus for no more than 8 hours per week, as long as this does not conflict with the terms of the external funding agreement.

A research assistantship (RA) entails work on a faculty research project not necessarily related to the student's dissertation. RAs work 15 to 20 hours per week. If the research project directly relates to the student's dissertation, then the appointment is a graduate research assistantship, in which case the time spent on research connected with the project is expected to be significant.

The  John S. Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines  allots the Linguistics department TA-ships for our graduate students to teach a First-Year Writing Seminar. This program emphasizes the humanities and social sciences and provides graduate students in all fields the opportunity to lead small undergraduate writing seminars and even to develop their own unique course syllabi. All graduate student instructors of First-Year Writing Seminars are required to take Writing 7100: Teaching Writing, a summer or fall semester one-credit course that provides a thorough pedagogical and experiential grounding in teaching. The department of Linguistics has approved courses that are offered as a writing seminar. If you would like to propose a new writing seminar, you will need to fill out the pre-EPC form.

Students may serve as language instructors for their TA-ship.  These also involve 15-20 hours a week.  Students with appropriate language background who are given such assignments are required to fulfill the respective department's training requirements.

Fellowships

The Graduate Field now requires all graduate students to apply for external funding at some point in their first four years. Students in the field of Linguistics are encouraged to apply for a variety of fellowships such as the National Science Foundation and the Social Science Research Council Fellowships. Also, the area programs at Cornell (East Asian, Southeast Asia, South Asia and European Studies) offer federally supported Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to students whose research focuses on any of these areas.

Many of these non-Cornell sourced external fellowships are intended for students who are U.S. citizens or nationals or permanent residents of the United States. Applicants from foreign countries should seek aid from their own governments, universities, corporations or from a U.S. agency operating abroad, such as the Institute for International Education or the Fulbright-Hays Program.

Under certain conditions, external funds can be used to extend the package of guaranteed support from the Field or used in place of the teaching assistantship or research apprenticeship to allow the recipient to focus on research. The Graduate School and Field policies on modifying the initial package are available from the Director of Graduate Studies. Currently, students who are awarded these fellowships receive the two "free" years of SAGE funding (i.e., the first year and the dissertation year), but not the University-funded RA or TA stipends in the years that are covered by the external fellowship. 

The East Asian Program offers the following fellowships that have no citizenship restrictions. These three typically provide tuition and stipend for one semester. 

Einaudi Center Funding-East Asia Program Fellowships

  • Robert J. Smith Fellowships in Japanese Studies
  • Starr Fellowships
  • Lee Teng-hui Fellowships in World Affairs

Einaudi Center grants: http://einaudi.cornell.edu/student-funding Cornell's Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS), Fulbright-Hayes Awards, Fulbright Program, International Research Travel Grants: The Mario Einaudi Center and its associated Programs offer a wide range of support and assistance to graduate students in search of funding for their international research, study and scholarship. See web site for deadlines, usually late January.

Graduate School Fellowship Database: http://gradschool.cornell.edu/fellowships/ A searchable database of fellowships of all kinds - well worth a look!

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSFGRFP):   http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=6201 The National Science Foundation funds research and education in most fields of science and engineering. For U.S. citizens and permanent residents, these are very competitive, but they provide a multi-year package of fellowship funding. College seniors, first- and second-year students with no more than 12 months of graduate study (i.e. no MA/MS degree) are eligible. It is most advisable to apply in your first year, if you are eligible. Even if you feel you do not have much linguistics research experience, the experience of writing the proposal is worthwhile. You will also get feedback from the NSF Fellowship Panel, which you can incorporate into an improved application the following year, if you do not succeed the first time. If you wait until your final year of eligibility to apply, you cannot take a second chance.

Social Science Research Council fellowships:  https://www.ssrc.org/fellowships-and-opportunities/ Most support from the Council goes to predissertation, dissertation and postdoctoral fellowships, offered through annual, peer-reviewed competitions.

NSF dissertation improvement grants (DDRIG):  http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505033&org=SBE&sel_org=SBE&from=fund These are for post-A-exam dissertation writers. There is no U.S. citizenship requirement. The grants supply up to $12,000 for research-related expenses. Deadlines are July 15th and January 15th of each year. The Principal Investigator should be the student's dissertation advisor, and the student should be the Co-Principal Investigator. It is expected that the student (Co-PI) will author the proposal, which will then be submitted through the university by the dissertation advisor (PI).

Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships: http://www.acls.org/programs/dcf

Recently Offered Seminars

The department of linguistics offers a wide variety of graduate-level seminars. Seminar topics vary each semester based on the research interests of the graduate students and faculty.

  • Finite State Methods
  • Optimality Theory
  • Neuro-linguistics
  • Old Iranian
  • Sanskrit Historical Grammar
  • Phonetics in the Lexicon
  • Timing and Weight in Phonology and Phonetics
  • Information Structure
  • Modality, Negative Polarity
  • Polarity, Alternatives, Modality, Pragmatics
  • Aspect of Interface between Syntax and Morpho-Phonology
  • Relation Based Syntax
  • Peripheries

Research Facilities

The Computational Linguistics Lab focuses on the statistical parsing of large data samples, including grammar development, parameter estimation, and acquisition of lexical information from corpora.

The Language Documentation Lab provides resources and laboratory space for research involving language documentation, description, and analysis, with an emphasis on understudied languages.

The Phonetics Lab offers state-of-the-art facilities for research in articulatory movement tracking, ultrasound, electroglottography, and speech aerodynamics. The phonetics lab is part of the Cornell Speech Imaging Group (SIG), a cross-disciplinary team of researchers using real-time magnetic resonance imaging to study the dynamics of speech articulation. 

Faculty and students in the Computational Psycholinguistic Discussions research group (C.Psyd) are interested in the intersection of computational linguistics and psycholinguistics. By building computational models to predict human language processing behavior (e.g., reading times), we can study the linguistic features that impact human processing decisions. Relatedly, C.Psyd members use psycholinguistic techniques to study the strategies used by neural networks to produce high accuracy in different language contexts, which gives us insights as to when different strategies might be employed by humans.

At the Linguistic Meaning (LiMe) Lab we investigate the complex process by which humans assign meaning to utterances. To do so, we combine insights from linguistic theory and cognitive science more broadly with experimental and computational methods. Contact: [email protected]

Cornell Linguistics Circle

The Cornell Linguistics Circle (CLC) is the graduate student group of the Cornell Department of Linguistics.  Students from linguistics and related fields are welcome to attend CLC meetings and participate in planned activities. The CLC serves to promote exchange of ideas among graduate students in the field and to advocate for the graduate student body within the department. Throughout the course of the academic year the CLC invites a series of outside speakers from linguistics departments around the country and the world.  Speakers deliver talks attended by faculty and graduate students (followed by a CLC-sponsored reception, of course!) and are often available for one-on-one meetings with interested students. The CLC also publishes The Proceedings of SALT, which contains articles developed from work presented at the annual Semantics and Linguistic Theory conference. All volumes of the Proceedings of SALT are available online through the LSA.

CLC Officers 2023-24

Facebook icon

  • Interesting for you
  • My settings

Study cover for Applied Linguistics

Applied Linguistics

The Applied Linguistics PhD programme from University of York is designed to enhance specialised linguistic knowledge through academic study and research.  

Logo University of York

Key Features:

  • The Applied Linguistics PhD programme from University of York is suitable for all those interested in exploring how linguistic knowledge can be applied to everyday real-life phenomena such as language learning, language policy or language processing.
  • The course emphasises state-of-the-art research methodology appropriate for conducting linguistic research projects, using a wide range of linguistic research methods.

Get more details

Programme structure.

  • Second language acquisition
  • Language learning
  • Discourse studies and discourse analysis
  • Psycholinguistics
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Language policy
  • Language for specific purposes (eg academic, professional)
  • Forensic linguistics

Check out the full curriculum

Key information.

  • 36 months

Start dates & application deadlines

  • Apply before 2025-06-15 00:00:00 , International The deadline is applicable to students from outside the European Economic Area who want to study within the EEA, or to students who want to study outside the EEA but are not nationals of that country. ">

If you're an international student, it's best to apply at least three months prior to your intended start date. 

Interested in IELTS preparation material? Get started here

Disciplines

Explore more key information, academic requirements, english requirements, student insurance.

Make sure to cover your health, travel, and stay while studying abroad. Even global coverages can miss important items, so make sure your student insurance ticks all the following:

  • Additional medical costs (i.e. dental)
  • Repatriation, if something happens to you or your family
  • Home contents and baggage

We partnered with Aon to provide you with the best affordable student insurance, for a carefree experience away from home.

Starting from €0.53/day, free cancellation any time.

Remember, countries and universities may have specific insurance requirements. To learn more about how student insurance work at University of York and/or in United Kingdom, please visit Student Insurance Portal .

Other requirements

General requirements.

  • Applicants are expected to have a good honours degree or a master's degree (MA, MSc or MEd) in a relevant discipline (eg MA degree in Applied Linguistics, Psychology, English, English for Academic Purposes, Education, Modern Languages, Linguistics) although candidates with other evidence of ability to succeed at PhD level will also be considered.
  • If English is not your first language, we do expect you to be able to demonstrate a high level of proficiency.  The minimum requirement for PhD in Applied Linguistics is IELTS 7.0 with 6.5 in Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking.  For further information please see English language requirements.
  • As part of the application process, you will be invited for interview (face-to-face or via Skype). 
  • You must submit a research proposal; we are unable to consider your application without one.

Make sure you meet all requirements

Tuition fee, international, living costs for york.

The living costs include the total expenses per month, covering accommodation, public transportation, utilities (electricity, internet), books and groceries.

Check for any work restrictions

In order for us to give you accurate scholarship information, we ask that you please confirm a few details and create an account with us.

Scholarships Information

Below you will find PhD's scholarship opportunities for Applied Linguistics.

Available Scholarships

You are eligible to apply for these scholarships but a selection process will still be applied by the provider.

Read more about eligibility

  • missing or incomplete ?"> Missing or incomplete content
  • wrong or outdated ?"> Wrong or outdated content

Other interesting programmes for you

Our partners.

Check the official website for even more information about this programme.

Go to your profile page to get personalised recommendations!

  • Skip to Main
  • Graduate Students
  • Department Directory
  • Spring 2023 Undergraduate Course Schedule
  • Spring 2023 Graduate Course Schedule
  • Fall 2023 Graduate Course Schedule
  • Fall 2023 Undergraduate Course Schedule
  • Spring 2024 Undergraduate Course Schedule
  • Spring 2024 Graduate Course Schedule
  • Fall 2024 Undergraduate Course Schedule
  • Fall 2024 Graduate Course Schedule
  • Declare a Major or Minor.
  • Honors in Linguistics
  • PhD Program
  • FAQ for Graduate Applicants
  • 2023- 2024 NYU Linguistics Colloquium Series
  • Summer 2022 News
  • Fall 2022 News
  • Spring 2023 News
  • Summer 2023 News
  • Fall 2023 News
  • Spring 2024 News
  • Summer 2024 News

Department of Linguistics

About the department.

The New York University Linguistics Department has established itself as a top linguistics program in the United States and the world, covering an extensive range of subfields including: phonetics/phonology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, morphology, neurolinguistics, language acquisition, and computational linguistics.

The Linguistics Department has 18 core faculty members, 1 Global Distinguished professor, and several visiting professors and scholars each year, with 8 laboratories and research groups. Click below for more information about our labs and research groups.

      READ MORE

Recent News

Jun. 06, 2024, szabolcsi in theoretical linguistics, jun. 20, 2024, soo-hwan lee’s dissertation defense and new position, may. 20, 2024, gotah in linguistic variation, may. 15, 2024, nyu linguists in american speech, may. 02, 2024, alsop in glossa, feb. 27, 2024, gotah and lee in syntax, feb. 16, 2024, bernard and champollion publish "negative events and compositional semantics" in the journal of semantics, madeline gilbert accepts tenure-track position at u of georgia, feb. 12, 2024, lucas champollion awarded humboldt research fellowship, jan. 03, 2024, lucas champollion coauthors supreme court amicus brief on scope ambiguity, jan. 02, 2024, congratulations to our honored lsa fellows greg guy and alec marantz, dec. 11, 2023, congratulations to our fall 2023 durf award winners, nov. 14, 2023, lucas champollion gives colloquia at umass and mit, masha esipova accepts tenure-track position at bar-ilan, sep. 13, 2023, lisa davidson has received a grant from the national science foundation, omar agha’s new position, aug. 18, 2023, lee and mackenzie in canadian journal of linguistics, aug. 07, 2023, nyu phoneticians shine at icphs 2023 in prague, useful links.

  • Undergraduate Program in Linguistics
  • Undergraduate Admissions
  • FAQ for Undergraduate Students
  • Graduate Program in Linguistics
  • GSAS Application Resource Center

WHERE TO FIND US

NYU Department of Linguistics Map

Search NYU Steinhardt

binders

Doctor of Philosophy Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Pursue scholarship that builds on your interests in language development and multilingual education. This doctoral program will advance your knowledge of language education pedagogy, intercultural communication, research methodologies and educational foundations. You’ll conduct research in language development and pedagogy and prepare for a career in academic, multilingual, and bicultural settings.

teacher3

Degree Details

Official degree title.

Phd in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

What You'll Learn

You’ll combine courses on the foundation of Teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) and research methods as you explore the value of multilingualism and multiliteracy, emphasizing respect for and appreciation of all languages and cultures. You’ll explore:

  • Development of English as a new or foreign language, pedagogy, and research
  • How to implement alternative research methodologies
  • Intercultural communication
  • Educational foundations

Your Academic Experience

Research opportunities.

Located in one of the most diverse urban settings in the world, NYU is an ideal facility for conducting educational research. As a doctoral student in our program, you will research and prepare your dissertation while working closely with your faculty mentor.

Doctoral Seminars

Your doctoral course work dedicated to TESOL will be supplemented with departmental content seminars and a dissertation proposal seminar. Open to doctoral students enrolled in any department or program at NYU, these seminars foster deep conversations on relevant literature and texts, and reflections on issues and research in the field. You’ll work on a paper or project, refine your scholarly voice, and define a dissertation focus.

Careers and Outcomes

Upon completion of your doctorate, you’ll be prepared for a career as a researcher or teacher educator in TESOL in colleges and universities; a curriculum specialist, developer, or evaluator in government agencies and nongovernmental organizations.

Funding for Full-Time PhD Students

If you are accepted as a full-time NYU Steinhardt PhD student without an alternate funding source, you are eligible for our competitive funding package, which includes a tuition scholarship and living stipend.  Learn more about our funding opportunities .

Online Info Session

In this session, NYU faculty share information about the PhD programs in the department of Teaching & Learning, including the PhD in Teaching & Learning, PhD in English Education, PhD in Bilingual Education, and PhD in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. Faculty provide an overview of the programs and answer questions from potential applicants.

If you have any additional questions about our degree, please feel free to contact Shondel Nero at [email protected] .

Take the Next Step

Advance your personal and professional journey – apply to join our community of students.

NBC New York

‘Unimaginable loss': NYPD recruit dies after collapsing on ‘exertion course' at training facility

Thirty-three-year-old edgar ordonez was set to graduate in just a few days, by myles miller , tom shea and jennifer vazquez • published july 10, 2024 • updated on july 11, 2024 at 7:34 am, what to know.

  • A 33-year-old police recruit, identified by NYPD Commissioner Edward Caban as Probationary Officer Edgar Ordonez, was on what is described as the "exertion course" at Rodman's Neck around 11 a.m. Wednesday, according to a law enforcement source, when he became lightheaded and passed out.
  • It is unknown at this time what exactly Ordonez was doing during the training exercise. It is also unknown if his death is considered heat-related. 
  • Ordonez was set to graduate in just days.

An NYPD recruit died after collapsing at the department's training facility in the Bronx, police said — just days before he was set to graduate.

The 33-year-old police recruit, identified by NYPD Commissioner Edward Caban as Probationary Officer Edgar Ordonez, was on what is described as the "exertion course" at Rodman's Neck around 11 a.m. Wednesday, according to a law enforcement source, when he became lightheaded and passed out.

24/7 New York news stream: Watch NBC 4 free wherever you are

Ordonez was rushed to Jacobi Medical Center where he was pronounced dead. He was set to graduate from the police academy on Monday and officially join the department.

It is unknown at this time what exactly Ordonez was doing during the training exercise. Former NYPD Chief of Department Terry Monahan said the training course is mostly an outdoor firing range that is intended to give trainees experience high stress situations. The so-called "exertion course" is one of the last tasks for probationary officers to complete before they graduate.

It is also unknown if the medical emergency was in any way heat-related amid Wednesday's stifling temperatures.

Get Tri-state area news and weather forecasts to your inbox. Sign up for NBC New York newsletters.

Caban shared his condolences in a post on X.

phd linguistics york

1 dead, 1 hurt in Tompkins Square Park broad daylight shooting

phd linguistics york

Up to 4 inches of rain possible as humidity fuels storm threat; flood watch issued for NYC area

Our hearts are heavy as we honor our fallen brother, Probationary Police Officer Edgar Ordonez. We tragically lost Edgar earlier today, just a few days before he was set to graduate and join his fellow Finest protecting New York City.     As we continue to grieve this terrible… pic.twitter.com/llqTh3E7Ko — Edward A. Caban (@NYPDPC) July 10, 2024

"Our hearts are heavy as we honor our fallen brother, Probationary Police Officer Edgar Ordonez. We tragically lost Edgar earlier today, just a few days before he was set to graduate and join his fellow Finest protecting New York City," Caban's post read.    

"As we continue to grieve this terrible loss, we will keep Edgar’s family, friends, and fellow officers in our thoughts and prayers," the message continued.

The grieving family of Ordonez did not wish to speak to reporters, only saying that he was a loving brother and father. A family member said they were not aware of any underlying condition that could have contributed to his death.

Meanwhile, NYC PBA President Patrick Hendry also issued a statement on Ordonez's passing, calling it an "unimaginable loss."

“Our brother Police Officer Edgar Ordonez was a beacon of joy and positive energy for his fellow recruits. He had the drive and determination necessary to become a New York City police officer, and he was just days away from hitting the streets and making a difference in protecting our city. From the moment a police officer is sworn into the Police Academy, they become part of our Blue Family. Now we must focus on being there for his family as they deal with this unimaginable loss," said Hendry's statement.

In a tweet, New York City Mayor Eric Adams said Ordonez "Ordonez was committed to protecting New Yorkers, and his journey has ended far too soon. The loss of a dedicated public servant is a reminder of just how dangerous this heat can be."

Additional information was not immediately available. The city's medical examiner will determine the cause of death.

This article tagged under:

phd linguistics york

  • About the New York Fed
  • Bank Leadership
  • Diversity and Inclusion
  • Communities We Serve
  • Board of Directors
  • Disclosures
  • Ethics and Conflicts of Interest
  • Annual Financial Statements
  • News & Events
  • Advisory Groups
  • Vendor Information
  • Holiday Schedule

At the New York Fed, our mission is to make the U.S. economy stronger and the financial system more stable for all segments of society. We do this by executing monetary policy, providing financial services, supervising banks and conducting research and providing expertise on issues that impact the nation and communities we serve.

New York Innovation Center

The New York Innovation Center bridges the worlds of finance, technology, and innovation and generates insights into high-value central bank-related opportunities.

Information Requests

Do you have a request for information and records? Learn how to submit it.

Gold Vault

Learn about the history of the New York Fed and central banking in the United States through articles, speeches, photos and video.

  • Markets & Policy Implementation
  • Reference Rates
  • Effective Federal Funds Rate
  • Overnight Bank Funding Rate
  • Secured Overnight Financing Rate
  • SOFR Averages & Index
  • Broad General Collateral Rate
  • Tri-Party General Collateral Rate
  • Desk Operations
  • Treasury Securities
  • Agency Mortgage-Backed Securities
  • Reverse Repos
  • Securities Lending
  • Central Bank Liquidity Swaps
  • System Open Market Account Holdings
  • Primary Dealer Statistics
  • Historical Transaction Data
  • Monetary Policy Implementation
  • Agency Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securities
  • Agency Debt Securities
  • Repos & Reverse Repos
  • Discount Window
  • Treasury Debt Auctions & Buybacks as Fiscal Agent
  • INTERNATIONAL MARKET OPERATIONS
  • Foreign Exchange
  • Foreign Reserves Management
  • Central Bank Swap Arrangements
  • Statements & Operating Policies
  • Survey of Primary Dealers
  • Survey of Market Participants
  • Annual Reports
  • Primary Dealers
  • Standing Repo Facility Counterparties
  • Reverse Repo Counterparties
  • Foreign Exchange Counterparties
  • Foreign Reserves Management Counterparties
  • Operational Readiness
  • Central Bank & International Account Services
  • Programs Archive
  • Economic Research
  • Consumer Expectations & Behavior
  • Survey of Consumer Expectations
  • Household Debt & Credit Report
  • Home Price Changes
  • Growth & Inflation
  • Equitable Growth Indicators
  • Multivariate Core Trend Inflation
  • New York Fed DSGE Model
  • New York Fed Staff Nowcast
  • R-star: Natural Rate of Interest
  • Labor Market
  • Labor Market for Recent College Graduates
  • Financial Stability
  • Corporate Bond Market Distress Index
  • Outlook-at-Risk
  • Treasury Term Premia
  • Yield Curve as a Leading Indicator
  • Banking Research Data Sets
  • Quarterly Trends for Consolidated U.S. Banking Organizations
  • Empire State Manufacturing Survey
  • Business Leaders Survey
  • Supplemental Survey Report
  • Regional Employment Trends
  • Early Benchmarked Employment Data
  • INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY
  • Global Supply Chain Pressure Index
  • Staff Economists
  • Visiting Scholars
  • Resident Scholars
  • PUBLICATIONS
  • Liberty Street Economics
  • Staff Reports
  • Economic Policy Review
  • RESEARCH CENTERS
  • Applied Macroeconomics & Econometrics Center (AMEC)
  • Center for Microeconomic Data (CMD)
  • Economic Indicators Calendar
  • Financial Institution Supervision
  • Regulations
  • Reporting Forms
  • Correspondence
  • Bank Applications
  • Community Reinvestment Act Exams
  • Frauds and Scams

As part of our core mission, we supervise and regulate financial institutions in the Second District. Our primary objective is to maintain a safe and competitive U.S. and global banking system.

The Governance & Culture Reform

The Governance & Culture Reform hub is designed to foster discussion about corporate governance and the reform of culture and behavior in the financial services industry.

Need to file a report with the New York Fed?

Need to file a report with the New York Fed? Here are all of the forms, instructions and other information related to regulatory and statistical reporting in one spot.

Frauds and Scams

The New York Fed works to protect consumers as well as provides information and resources on how to avoid and report specific scams.

  • Financial Services & Infrastructure
  • Services For Financial Institutions
  • Payment Services
  • Payment System Oversight
  • International Services, Seminars & Training
  • Tri-Party Repo Infrastructure Reform
  • Managing Foreign Exchange
  • Money Market Funds
  • Over-The-Counter Derivatives

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York works to promote sound and well-functioning financial systems and markets through its provision of industry and payment services, advancement of infrastructure reform in key markets and training and educational support to international institutions.

The New York Innovation Center

The New York Fed offers the Central Banking Seminar and several specialized courses for central bankers and financial supervisors.

Tri-party Infrastructure Reform

The New York Fed has been working with tri-party repo market participants to make changes to improve the resiliency of the market to financial stress.

  • Community Development & Education
  • Household Financial Well-being
  • Fed Communities
  • Fed Listens
  • Fed Small Business
  • Workforce Development
  • Other Community Development Work
  • High School Fed Challenge
  • College Fed Challenge
  • Teacher Professional Development
  • Classroom Visits
  • Museum & Learning Center Visits
  • Educational Comic Books
  • Economist Spotlight Series
  • Lesson Plans and Resources
  • Economic Education Calendar

Our Community Development Strategy

We are connecting emerging solutions with funding in three areas—health, household financial stability, and climate—to improve life for underserved communities. Learn more by reading our strategy.

Economic Inequality & Equitable Growth

The Economic Inequality & Equitable Growth hub is a collection of research, analysis and convenings to help better understand economic inequality.

Government and Culture Reform

Welcome Remarks: PhD Excellence Initiative

Remarks following an introduction by Dr. Peter Blair Henry at the PhD Excellence Initiative’s annual summer research workshop, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The PhD Excellence Initiative is a nonprofit that prepares high-achieving college graduates of color for top-tier Ph.D. economics programs.

Thank you, Peter for that great introduction! Good morning, all, and on behalf of the New York Fed, welcome. It is a joyous thing for me to be able to engage with you this morning.

But before I do anything else, I want to use this moment to tell you about the length of the right tail of the skill distribution.

The person who you just heard is an economist of the first order. He is a highly sought-after organizational leader. He is engaged in both civic and corporate leadership at the highest levels.

But he also ran crossing routes at an ACC school, and apparently(!), he could throw it down in ways that the late great Bill Walton would appreciate.

So, you must realize now that it’s all downhill from here….

Before we go further, I should note that my remarks reflect my personal opinions and do not necessarily reflect those of the New York Fed or the Federal Reserve System. And with that, let me turn to the task at hand—to welcome you properly to this event, and to our Bank.

The PhD Excellence Initiative has a mission that I think is extremely sensible. It works “… foremost, by identifying high-achieving emerging scholars (college graduates or graduating seniors) who demonstrate a passion for economic research—as well as the deepest commitment to bringing new perspectives—and preparing these students for the rigors of a doctoral program in economics.”

This mode of attack on the problem is, in my view, exactly correct. And it is important . I’ll start with importance, and then to why I think it’s correct .

It is important for the students whose trajectory it ultimately alters, of course. But it is most important in my view, as a way to continue a process that will deliver an economics that looks like us—as a nation, as a world, and one that works on all the problems that matter. That is the promise, and what I see being at stake here.

It is correct, because there is really only one durable way to realize this end state of a healthier profession. And that starts with winning in the first step of the game as it is now played. When I say “game,” I mean simply the current norms and practices of the economics profession. And when I say “win,” I mean getting into, and then through, a respected Ph.D. program.

Now, we all know the facts here—the numbers are grim. This in turn means we have, for a very long time now, implicitly left to non-minorities the task of studying the issues of greatest import to minority communities.

Do We Need Diversity to Get at Diverse Concerns?

Now, a beautiful thing about economics is that it is resolutely empirical, even in its theorizing. In macroeconomics alone, the biggest changes by far in how we reason about the economy have come about due to unpleasant collisions of existing theory with data. The Great Depression, the stagflation of the 1970s, and the great financial crisis each led to sizeable shifts in how we thought about the economy. So maybe, just maybe, the profession’s progress is not slowed so much by its staggering non-representativeness? Maybe the facts of the world lead all reasonable people—including the rather non-diverse group of incumbents—to take on all the pressing issues of the day in much the same way as any other group would?

I don’t think it’s a good bet.

In my own career, I have seen attention to pressing topics seemingly die off due to fashions in the profession evolving as they have. Growth, and cross-country income gaps, which are almost without doubt the most important topic for human well-being one can think of, have lost ground to many other topics. And here I think broader lived experience may well matter hugely. For example, I have no doubt that the economic impacts of climate change would dominate economics if the profession had more representation from South Asia and Africa. With greater diversity in the profession, I have no doubt that even the economics of criminal justice and human capital’s interaction with the carceral system would be richer, and also would not have been left nearly as much to the other social sciences. I have no doubt the scarring effects of recessions would feel more urgent to get a grip on if Latin American economists were more prevalent.

What I think is worse is that the topics that do get studied are almost surely poorer for it. When I look at our profession, I see less incremental progress, and more coming from giants who occasionally come along and really change the way we all think. Ken Arrow, Bob Lucas, Ed Prescott, and Mike Woodford are beacons for me on the macro side, and people like Josh Angrist and Al Roth, among a handful of others on the micro side, have changed the entire profession’s aperture and approach to key issues. Yet quite obviously, this is hardly a diverse group. So if we want game-changing thinking on the topics that matter existentially to some, but not all, of us—like how race and gender matter in our economy—I think it’s essential to max out on the talent we attract. This is a numbers game in my view. So…we need the numbers. The Glenn Lourys and Claudia Goldins of our world are still too much the exceptions to give us a chance at the next big breakthrough.

Let’s Talk About Us as Individuals

So much for how the PhD Excellence Initiative matters for our profession. Let’s return to why this initiative also matters for individuals . We see that it is an effort that starts by identifying those who have an abiding interest in our subject. This is key—life is short, but it is far too long to work on problems you don’t actually care about. So you gotta care—and you do.

PhD Excellence Initiative invests in those—like you—who not only have the interest, but have earned the credibility to be invested in. People who have demonstrated that they are going to grind. And it does so by explicitly pushing its cohorts to meet a bar, never to change that bar. This is what it will take to populate the ranks of professorships, of research departments at Feds like this one, and other places where you belong tomorrow—moving our thinking forward in ways that cannot be ignored. Why? Because you will publish in the best places, and people will just have to deal with it.

So now , Peter, me, and many others want you to be in a profession where you belong, where your ideas are engaged with, and where you are given the real respect of having those ideas challenged as hard as you’ll ever have them challenged.

Let me turn now to something extremely positive. Our profession may not be diverse, but it is very competitive. Its baseline problem is that too few come to our “tryouts,” not that those at tryouts are no good (which would be a deeper problem).

Competitiveness Means Forgetfulness, AKA, WHYDFML?

And PhD Excellence Initiative is to me all about “ getting more of us to a competitive tryout. ” This is why it can—and I think will—move the needle. Let me explain.

Ours is in ways a profession that embodies “what have you done for me lately?” (WHYDFML?) WHYDFML means brutal treatment at times, it means relentless pressure perhaps. But it also means a kind of fairness that mere platitudes and words cannot deliver. And that is why I think you will succeed.

It’s long been noted that hypercompetitive settings are almost unique in the American landscape as being the ones where, despite bias and barriers, minority populations have thrived—sports and entertainment most obviously. Good people cannot, in a competitive world, be kept down. They can be kept out, maybe, but not nearly as easily kept down once allowed or encouraged in.

A far less inspiring, but personal, example is that of my own professional life. I am someone unusual around here because I did not attend one of our most elite schools at any level. I instead attended a sequence of non-elite state schools. And even though I was taught extremely well by excellent economists, I struggled to compete with those who came with much better preparation—often from all over the world.  

Eventually, though, I did see things come together—mainly through a grind that I committed myself to. I wrote a decent thesis, and then—and this is the central point I want you to hear: the job market simply reset itself .  As far as employers were concerned, my thesis was “the last thing I did for anyone lately” (TLTIDFAL!)  And that was the thing that defined me as I looked for my first research economist job.

And it got better. Once I had the job, my thesis was no longer relevant—my latest papers were the new “last thing I did for anyone lately.” Then I took on managerial roles, and my performance in those superseded what came before. And so on.

In that way, economics is a lot like sports: we all know it’s silly to place any weight on where a third-year pro in the NBA went to college. Who cares? You have three years of performance to look at now. But economics is like a sport where the talent-feeder system is a mess. So we miss out all the time on talent in ways that the NBA simply does not. If you have potential to ball out, the Association will find you. We have no equivalent system at scale.

We are instead a field where it is simultaneously true that the top schools place the most people in elite places—a premise that PhD Excellence Initiative accepts— and that elite performance is rewarded with less regard to where it came from. That second point means that all preparation pays off —even if some of you wind up outside the most elite Ph.D. programs.

So grind, people, knowing that you’ll get rewarded. We need numbers from your ranks in the better Ph.D. programs in the U.S., and we need completion and more students like you thriving in not just those programs but wherever you end up going. This can work. It will be very hard. But it, and it alone, due to WHYDFML, can and will succeed.

Thank you, and I wish you a truly productive day—and also that in a couple of decades, one of you will take Peter’s place, and another, mine.

Close

  • Request a Speaker
  • International Seminars & Training
  • Governance & Culture Reform
  • Data Visualization
  • Economic Research Tracker
  • Markets Data APIs
  • Terms of Use

Federal Reserve Bank Seal

The UCLA Linguistics Department’s normal business hours are M-F 8am-12pm, 1-4pm. Office schedule and availability may change based on UCLA protocol ( www.covid-19.ucla.edu). Masks are optional but strongly recommended indoors. All UCLA affiliates and visitors must self-screen for symptoms before coming to campus.

UCLA

The Department of Linguistics

STUDENT_RESEARCH_PROJECT_APPLICATION_FORM_Updated 2024-07-02

News Categories

  • Celebrations
  • Conferences
  • Graduate Students
  • Journal Publications
  • Publications
  • Undergraduate Students

Recent News

  • ALTERNATE STAFF/MAIN OFFICE SCHEDULE FOR SUMMER 2024 (June 17-September 20, 2024)
  • Linguistics Alum Ananda Lima’s Fiction Debut
  • Professor Jody Kreiman awarded the Silver Medal in Speech Communication
  • UCLA @ SALT 34
  • Eleanor Glewwe accepts position at Grinnell College
  • Department Overview
  • Job Opportunties
  • Ph.D. Recipients
  • Faculty Office Hours
  • TA Office Hours
  • In Memoriam
  • What is Linguistics?
  • Prospective Students
  • Majors and Minor
  • Opportunities
  • American Sign Language
  • Bruin Linguists Society
  • Student Resources
  • The Graduate Program
  • For Prospective Students
  • For Current Students
  • Course Schedule
  • Undergraduate Courses
  • Current Proseminars
  • Archive of past proseminars
  • Summer Courses
  • Course Technology Requirements
  • Overview of Research
  • UCLA Working Papers
  • Psycholinguistics Laboratory
  • Digital and other research resources
  • Visiting Scholar Requirements
  • Room Reservation Request
  • Key Loan Request
  • General Information for Students
  • For Department Members

Our cookies

We use cookies for three reasons: to give you the best experience on PGS, to make sure the PGS ads you see on other sites are relevant , and to measure website usage. Some of these cookies are necessary to help the site work properly and can’t be switched off. Cookies also support us to provide our services for free, and by click on “Accept” below, you are agreeing to our use of cookies .You can manage your preferences now or at any time.

Privacy overview

We use cookies, which are small text files placed on your computer, to allow the site to work for you, improve your user experience, to provide us with information about how our site is used, and to deliver personalised ads which help fund our work and deliver our service to you for free.

The information does not usually directly identify you, but it can give you a more personalised web experience.

You can accept all, or else manage cookies individually. However, blocking some types of cookies may affect your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer.

You can change your cookies preference at any time by visiting our Cookies Notice page. Please remember to clear your browsing data and cookies when you change your cookies preferences. This will remove all cookies previously placed on your browser.

For more detailed information about the cookies we use, or how to clear your browser cookies data see our Cookies Notice

Manage consent preferences

Strictly necessary cookies

These cookies are necessary for the website to function and cannot be switched off in our systems.

They are essential for you to browse the website and use its features.

You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not then work. We can’t identify you from these cookies.

Functional cookies

These help us personalise our sites for you by remembering your preferences and settings. They may be set by us or by third party providers, whose services we have added to our pages. If you do not allow these cookies, then these services may not function properly.

Performance cookies

These cookies allow us to count visits and see where our traffic comes from, so we can measure and improve the performance of our site. They help us to know which pages are popular and see how visitors move around the site. The cookies cannot directly identify any individual users.

If you do not allow these cookies we will not know when you have visited our site and will not be able to improve its performance for you.

Marketing cookies

These cookies may be set through our site by social media services or our advertising partners. Social media cookies enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They can track your browser across other sites and build up a profile of your interests. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to see or use the content sharing tools.

Advertising cookies may be used to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but work by uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will still see ads, but they won’t be tailored to your interests.

PhD in Linguistics

University of york, different course options.

  • Key information

Course Summary

Tuition fees, entry requirements, similar courses at different universities, key information data source : idp connect, qualification type.

PhD/DPhil - Doctor of Philosophy

Subject areas

Linguistics

Course type

While the majority of your time is spent conducting your own research, you are also part of the life and culture of the Department.

In year 1 you undertake research training with your fellow students and staff, giving you invaluable insights into academic and research life as well as helping you to develop both general and subject-specific research skills. You might also audit some Masters-level classes to enhance your knowledge and skills. This training programme is designed at an individual level in consultation with the supervisor(s).

Throughout your three years you also engage with other researchers through Departmental seminars, activities organised by research groups, specialised training events, conferences, and collaborative events with national or international research partners.

You have access to top quality research facilities. We have dedicated laboratories for psycholinguistics (including eye tracking equipment, head turn facility, e-prime, Matlab) and forensic speech science (providing access to authentic forensic case materials, automatic speech recognition software, and speech analysis software). We also have a brand new professional-level recording suite. All postgraduates in Language and Linguistic Science have access to the facilities available in the Humanities Research Centre.

Your research progress is monitored through regular meetings with your supervisor(s), biannual meetings of your full thesis advisory panel, and a formal review each year with an independent progression panel.

UK fees Course fees for UK students

For this course (per year)

International fees Course fees for EU and international students

Typically you’ll need at least the equivalent to a UK upper second-class (2:1) honours degree and, in some cases, a Masters degree. Actual requirements vary by course.

English Language and Linguistics MSc

University of glasgow, comparative literature mlitt, english language and linguistics phd, speech, language and sociolinguistics msc, english language and linguistics mlitt (research).

Advertisement

Supported by

Heritage Foundation Head Refers to ‘Second American Revolution’

Kevin Roberts, president of the group that has coordinated the Project 2025 policy plan, said it could be “bloodless if the left allows it to be.”

  • Share full article

Balloons with the American flag on them in front of the Supreme Court.

By Maggie Astor

The president of the Heritage Foundation, a right-wing think tank that has developed a prominent series of policy plans to overhaul the federal government under a Republican president, said on Tuesday that the country was “in the process of the second American Revolution, which will remain bloodless if the left allows it to be.”

The group’s president, Kevin D. Roberts, made the comments in an interview on “The War Room,” the Trump adviser Stephen K. Bannon’s show on the network Real America’s Voice. (Mr. Bannon himself did not host the show on Tuesday, because he reported to prison the day before to serve a sentence for contempt of Congress.)

Mr. Roberts was discussing the Supreme Court’s ruling on Monday that presidents have substantial immunity from prosecution for what they do in office, a ruling that upended the criminal case against former President Donald J. Trump for his attempts to overturn the 2020 election and that removes a potential barrier to the most radical elements of his second-term agenda if he is elected again.

“We ought to be really encouraged by what happened yesterday, and in spite of all of the injustice — which of course friends and audience of this show, of our friend Steve, know — we are going to prevail,” Mr. Roberts said, alluding to Mr. Bannon’s imprisonment.

He went on to say that “the radical left” was “apoplectic” because “our side is winning” and said, “And so I come full circle in this response and just want to encourage you with some substance that we are in the process of the second American Revolution, which will remain bloodless if the left allows it to be.”

“Right on. Thank you, brother,” the interviewer, former Representative Dave Brat of Virginia, replied.

We are having trouble retrieving the article content.

Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.

Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and  log into  your Times account, or  subscribe  for all of The Times.

Thank you for your patience while we verify access.

Already a subscriber?  Log in .

Want all of The Times?  Subscribe .

IMAGES

  1. PhD

    phd linguistics york

  2. PhD in Linguistics

    phd linguistics york

  3. Phil FREESTONE

    phd linguistics york

  4. Languages and Linguistics

    phd linguistics york

  5. York University Canada Linguistics PhD

    phd linguistics york

  6. Language and Linguistic Science

    phd linguistics york

VIDEO

  1. General Linguistics

  2. Department of Language and Linguistic Science

  3. Theresa Biberauer (University of Cambridge)

  4. Conversation with Dr.Qasim Bughio, PhD in Linguistics, poet, and journalist (Part-2)

  5. Conversation with Dr.Qasim Bughio, PhD in Linguistics, poet, and journalist (Part-5)

  6. Conversation with Dr.Qasim Bughio, PhD in Linguistics, poet, and journalist (Part-4)

COMMENTS

  1. PhD in Linguistics

    PhD in Linguistics. While the majority of your time is spent conducting your own research, you are also part of the life and culture of the Department. In year 1 you undertake research training with your fellow students and staff, giving you invaluable insights into academic and research life as well as helping you to develop both general and ...

  2. PhD in Applied Linguistics

    The PhD in Applied Linguistics is designed to enhance specialised linguistic knowledge through academic study and research. The programme is suitable for all those interested in exploring how linguistic knowledge can be applied to everyday real-life phenomena such as language learning, language policy or language processing.

  3. PhD Programmes

    The PhD in Language and Communication is an interdisciplinary programme involving Education, Language and Linguistic Science, and Sociology. It focuses on investigating language and communicative structures - linguistic, sequential, gestural - as used in everyday life, in workplace settings, in educational settings, and in on-line interaction.

  4. Graduate Programs in Linguistics & Applied Linguistics

    Graduate Programs in Linguistics & Applied Linguistics Located in Canada's largest city, the Graduate Program in Linguistics & Applied Linguistics at York University is well known for the excellence of its faculty, students and teaching. Faculty research and supervision interests cover a broad spectrum of areas in the two offered fields of Linguistics & Applied Linguistics.

  5. PhD in Language and Communication

    The PhD in Language and Communication is an interdisciplinary programme involving Education, Language and Linguistic Science, Psychology and Sociology. It focuses on investigating language as it is used in the real world and the processes which underpin it. We conduct highly data-driven research into the communicative structures - linguistic ...

  6. Application for PhD in Applied Linguistics

    Research proposal or outline of academic interests. You can also choose to upload: Your CV (curriculum vitae) Copy of a language certificate. Personal statement.

  7. Language and Linguistic Science

    Language and Linguistic Science. A dynamic and innovative department, our expertise spans the arts and sciences. We offer an exciting range of courses combining modern foreign languages, English language, and linguistics.

  8. Linguistics, Ph.D.

    Within the Linguistics PhD programmefrom University of York, while the majority of your time is spent conducting your own research.

  9. PhD in Applied Linguistics at University of York

    The PhD in Applied Linguistics is designed to enhance specialised linguistic knowledge through academic study and research. The programme is suitable for all those interested in exploring how linguistic knowledge can be applied to everyday real-life phenomena such as language learning, language policy or language processing.

  10. PhD in Forensic Speech and Audio

    PhD in Linguistics; PhD in Language and Communication; PhD in Applied Linguistics; PhD in Psycholinguistics; PhD in Forensic Speech and Audio; PhD in Translation and Interpreting; Other sections. Language and Linguistic Science home; About us; People; Research; For current students; Staff area (login required) Undergraduate study; Postgraduate ...

  11. PhD in Language and Communication at University of York

    The PhD in Language and Communication is an interdisciplinary programme involving Education, Language and Linguistic Science, Psychology and Sociology. It focuses on investigating language as it is used in the real world and the processes which underpin it. We highly conduct data-driven research into the communicative structures - linguistic ...

  12. Postgraduate study

    Our major specialisms are in theoretical syntax and semantics, phonetics and phonology, language acquisition, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, historical linguistics and forensic speech science. All of our taught postgraduate programmes involve three terms of coursework and a dissertation.

  13. Graduate Program

    Graduate Program. The Ph.D. program in Linguistics is for students interested in a career in research. Students receive a solid training in the fundamentals of phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, neurolinguistics, language acquisition, and computational linguistics (see faculty groupings and links to ...

  14. PhD Defence: Lauren Schneider

    Join us for an Indigenous Languages Program PhD defence on July 31 9:00am - 12:00pm in RCB 7402.

  15. Linguistics Studies

    York University offers a Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics Studies. Learn how language is naturally organized. Investigate patterns, structure and syntax.

  16. PhD in Linguistics

    The mission of the department's PhD program is to train students to do research in linguistics and produce research that reflects the values and the mission of the department as a whole, to prepare them for academic jobs at teaching universities, liberal arts colleges, or major research universities and for jobs outside of academia. Our goal is to ensure that all of our students have at ...

  17. Linguistics & Applied Linguistics

    The objectives of the PhD program are to educate candidates in linguistics and applied linguistics. The program approaches the study of language from a variety of perspectives, with a primary focus on language in its social context. Students may concentrate their research in any number of areas, ranging from core linguistics (phonetics ...

  18. Frequently Asked Questions for Graduate Applicants

    Statements of purpose for graduate school, unlike those for college, focus on motivations for embarking on a Ph.D. in linguistics. Thus it is more important to highlight your professional development than your personal background and experiences (if you'd like to discuss those, you may submit a separate personal history statement in addition ...

  19. Linguistics

    The Graduate Center's Linguistics program draws on the resources of New York City and of its great public university to help students develop expertise in the one of world's most exciting fields.

  20. Graduate Program

    The department of linguistics offers a wide variety of graduate-level seminars. Seminar topics vary each semester based on the research interests of the graduate students and faculty.

  21. Applied Linguistics, Ph.D.

    The Applied Linguistics PhD programme from University of York is designed to enhance specialised linguistic knowledge through academic study and research.

  22. Department of Linguistics

    About the Department. The New York University Linguistics Department has established itself as a top linguistics program in the United States and the world, covering an extensive range of subfields including: phonetics/phonology, syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, morphology, neurolinguistics, language acquisition, and computational linguistics.

  23. PhD, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

    Engage in course work and research focused on language education pedagogy, language assessment, sociolinguistics, intercultural communication, and bilingual and multilingual teaching and learning in local and global contexts.

  24. What a Linguist Hears When Biden Speaks

    I don't think anyone would be shocked to hear that linguists generally study languages, but there is a corner of the discipline that studies something slightly different: pidgins.

  25. NYPD recruit dies after collapsing on exertion course at ...

    An NYPD recruit died after collapsing at the department's training facility in the Bronx, police said — just days before he was set to graduate.

  26. Welcome Remarks: PhD Excellence Initiative

    Remarks following an introduction by Dr. Peter Blair Henry at the PhD Excellence Initiative's annual summer research workshop, held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The PhD Excellence Initiative is a nonprofit that prepares high-achieving college graduates of color for top-tier Ph.D. economics programs.

  27. STUDENT_RESEARCH_PROJECT_APPLICATION_FORM_Updated 2024-07-02

    The UCLA Linguistics Department's normal business hours are M-F 8am-12pm, 1-4pm. Office schedule and availability may change based on UCLA protocol ... Home > The Graduate Program > For Current Students > Funding for Language Assistants and Experimental Subjects > STUDENT_RESEARCH_PROJECT_APPLICATION_FORM_Updated 2024-07-02.

  28. PhD in Linguistics at University of York

    All postgraduates in Language and Linguistic Science have access to the facilities available in the Humanities Research Centre. Your research progress is monitored through regular meetings with your supervisor (s), biannual meetings of your full thesis advisory panel, and a formal review each year with an independent progression panel.

  29. Heritage Foundation Head Refers to 'Second ...

    The president of the Heritage Foundation, a right-wing think tank that has developed a prominent series of policy plans to overhaul the federal government under a Republican president, said on ...

  30. PDF Thursday, July 11, 2024

    1 2024 MWBE REGIONAL OPPORTUNITIES EXPO SERIES - DOWNSTATE AGENDA Thursday, July 11, 2024 - CUNY Graduate Center - 365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM: EXHIBITOR REGISTRATION