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  • UCAS Personal Statements Are Changing in 2025

Last Updated: 16th January 2023

Author: Matthew Amalfitano-Stroud

Table of Contents

It was announced by UCAS in January of 2023 that traditional Personal Statements will be removed from the university application process in the UK. 

Since 1993, UCAS has required university applicants in the UK to submit a 4,000-character Personal Statement during the application process, which would then be accessed by university admissions teams to assist in the shortlisting process. 

However, it has been confirmed by UCAS that this process will be changing as soon as 2025. Here, we dissect the announcement, discuss what we currently know about this change and explain how this could affect your university application. Let’s begin:  

In short, this is what you need to know:

  • UCAS Personal Statements are being replaced by a multi-question survey that gives applicants the chance to explain various aspects of their application.
  • This change could be implemented as early as the 2025 admissions cycle for 2026 Entry in the UK.
  • This will affect all applicants, both home and internationals, looking to attend a UK university in 2026 and beyond.
  • Students will need to learn how to take on these new questions rather than traditional Personal Statement writing.
  • Teachers will need to be prepared to do research on this new system and provide support for students in order to maximise their chances of success.
  • We at UniAdmissions are keeping a very close eye on the situation and will update this guide as new information surfaces. We will also ensure that our support systems are up-to-date and effective at helping students through these changes.

What are Personal Statements Being Replaced with?

With the announcement that the current system for UCAS Personal Statements will be getting replaced, it is only natural to be asking what will be replacing it. Thankfully, we have already been given some idea of what to expect. 

Unlike the other major shake-up to the 2024 admission process, the removal of various admissions tests including the BMAT , the official announcement has provided us with an explanation of what UCAS is seeking to implement instead of traditional Personal Statements. 

Put simply, the current format of providing a 4,000-character piece of writing will be replaced with a series of specific questions which applicants must answer. These questions will still allow you to write your answers out, but you will be answering set questions instead of having to plan and structure a full statement from scratch. 

The specifics of this system have not been announced yet, including the number of questions and the character limits. We also don’t know what the questions will be yet as they are still being developed. However, we do know the key areas that these questions will focus on (all points are taken directly from the UCAS report): 

  • Motivation for Course – Why do you want to study these courses?
  • Preparedness for Course – How has your learning so far helped you to be ready to succeed on these courses?
  • Preparation through other experiences – What else have you done to help you prepare, and why are these experiences useful?
  • Extenuating circumstances – Is there anything that the universities and colleges need to know about, to help them put your achievements and experiences so far into context?
  • Preparedness for study – What have you done to prepare yourself for student life?
  • Preferred Learning Styles – Which learning and assessment styles best suit you – how do your courses choices match that?

Of course, this is all subject to change as UCAS is still actively working with universities to determine what they want most from applicants. However, it seems that they are aiming to cover the same ground as traditional Personal Statements while also allowing applicants to discuss more personal factors such as motivation, preference and extenuating circumstances. 

At UniAdmissions, we ensure all of our students receive the most up-to-date support.

At UniAdmissions, we’re working tirelessly to ensure that our tutors, curriculum and resources are ready to get our students through these changes. You can join them today and ensure you get the support you need to make it through the 2024 admissions cycle . 

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When Are UCAS Personal Statements Being Replaced?

The initial announcement stated that these reforms to the Personal Statement system will be introduced in the 2024 admissions cycle for 2025 entry. However, UCAS have since gone back on this and delayed the change to as early as 2025 (for 2026 Entry). However, this change could also occur the following year for 2027 Entry. 

UniAdmissions contacted UCAS directly to confirm if a date had been set for the implementation of the new Personal Statement format. The representative stated the following: 

The current discussion around the Personal Statement changes are to improve the application process for all applicants. At the moment the earliest this change would take place is in the 2026 application cycle. There won't be any changes this year. UCAS Representative

It’s worth mentioning that these plans have been in place for a fair amount of time, with discussions of reforming the application process starting in April 2021. However, this change still won’t be implemented for another year, so applicants applying for 2025 (and potentially 2026) Entry will still need to submit a traditional Personal Statement. 

Why Are UCAS Personal Statements Being Removed?

The announcement of these reforms was made on January 12th 2023 via a blog post on the official HEPI website. This post highlights the amendments being made to the Personal Statement process and the research that was conducted to influence this change.  

Interestingly, the data quoted in this post states that the majority of applicants surveyed were happy with the current Personal Statement process, with 72% feeling positive about it. However, the same survey indicated that 83% of applicants found the process stressful and 79% felt unable to complete theirs without support. This is the data that most likely influenced the changes. 

The post’s writer, Kim Eccleston, states that they are aiming to provide better support for both applicants and universities, creating “a more supportive framework” that allows applicants to write about what the universities need to know in a less restrictive way. It is also stated in a more detailed outline of the announcement that both students and teachers preferred the use of specific questions instead of free-form writing. 

However, a previous post released in November 2022 provides even more insight into the reasoning behind this decision. Based on data featured in HEPI Debate Paper 31 , various industry professionals had commented on the challenges facing applicants of certain background when it comes to the current style of Personal Statement. 

Within the quotes featured here, the traditional UCAS Personal Statement was described as “ambiguous” , “unfair” and “barometers of middle-class privilege” . These comments may potentially be in reference to the current importance of work experience, which can be difficult to obtain without connections in certain industries, as well as additional experiences which may not be available to all applicants.  

Therefore, this new system should presumably reduce the barriers for disadvantaged applicants by shifting focus to each individual’s own interest and abilities within their chosen subjects. 

Other Changes being Made by UCAS

Personal Statements are only one of five key areas being altered by UCAS, as highlighted in the blog post. This is certainly the most significant action taking place, but other changes to the application process include: 

  • Academic references are being reformed, moving from a free-text approach to a set of three questions, similar to the Personal Statement reforms.
  • The 'Entry Grade Report' will be created, which allows applicants to see grade profiles that have been accepted for courses over a five year period.
  • A 'Course Recommendation Tool' is being created to provide applicants with personalised suggestions for courses based on their current grades and preferences.
  • A 'Fair Access Programme' is being created to encourage widening access and participation.

Overall, it seems these changes all have the same intent; to level the playing field and make university applications more achievable for everyone. 

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How will this affect my university application?

As previously stated, if you are applying to university this year for 2025 Entry, you will not be affected by these reforms and will need to submit a traditional Personal Statement to UCAS like previous years. 

For applicants applying for 2026/27 Entry and beyond, your application will follow this new process, meaning you won’t have to submit a full Personal Statement but will instead need to answer a series of questions relating to your application and abilities for your chosen course. 

When hearing that the whole process will be changing, this typically instils a feeling of dread as you’ll be treading new ground that no one else has experienced before. However, it’s important to understand that UCAS states these changes are being made for the benefit of both the applicants and the universities. 

As we’ve already discussed, a key part of the reason this change is being implemented is that a high percentage of applicants found writing a traditional Personal Statement stressful, which is counterintuitive to what UCAS is trying to achieve. By providing applicants with a strong framework, in the form of specific questions, this new process should allow more applicants to provide better quality statements for universities. 

This change is also set to be particularly beneficial to those from disadvantaged backgrounds, as the process will allow them to better express their ability regardless of any areas that may be lacking due to factors out of their control. Essentially, the new process should allow more people to stand a better chance of making a good impression despite limitations. 

How Can I Start Preparing?

If you’re starting your preparations early, the main barrier you’ll face at this stage of preparation is not knowing what the questions will be, as they have yet to be announced. There are no resources available currently that cover this system, so you’re going to have to be independent with your preparation here.

Since we have a rough outline of what the questions to focus on, you should still be able to practice your responses. Although they won’t be as relevant any more, it would still be helpful to check out Personal Statement guides and examples as these can help you pin down the language and writing style you use. 

With all this information now available to us, you should be able to get a sense of what to do for your application in the coming years. The initial introduction of this system in 2024 will act as a test of its effectiveness, so elements could be changed in the years following. However, the important thing is that you understand how things are changing from the current system and how you can make the most of the new system. 

If you are applying for university in 2023 for 2024 Entry, you will need to make sure you’re ready to write your Personal Statement. Thankfully, UniAdmissions have plenty of resources to help you through it, including our Ultimate UCAS Personal Statement Guide and our collection of successful Oxbridge Personal Statements . 

If you’re looking for more in-depth support that covers the whole application process for Medicine, Law and Oxbridge courses, them find out how you can enrol in one of our Premium Programmes .  

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Regardless of what changes are made to the Oxbridge admissions process, we will be ready to provide you with the very best support for your application. Our students have access to expert Oxbridge tutors, comprehensive online courses, intensive preparation events and so much more. 

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UCAS ditching personal statement for university entry

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service ( Ucas ) will no longer require students to write a personal statement when applying for university .

The change comes amid claims that the personal statements favour middle-class students who may have better access to “high-quality advice and guidance”, according to Ucas.

The 4,000-character essay will be scrapped and replaced with a series of questions about the higher education course they are applying for.

Ucas announced in February 2022 that it was considering changes to university applications.

At the time, Michelle Donelan, the universities minister, said “I have always felt that personal statements in their current form favour the most advantaged students.

“So I’m pleased that Ucas have confirmed that reform of the personal statement is in their plans so that personal statements work to the benefit of all students.”

Ucas consulted with 1,200 students, 170 teachers, and more than 100 universities and colleges before making the reforms, as reported by The Times.

According to Ucas , although 72 per cent of respondents surveyed felt positive about the personal statement, 79 per cent agreed that writing the statement is difficult to complete without support, and 83 per cent said they found the process of writing a personal statement stressful.

The structured questions aim to  “bring focus and clarity for students, reducing the need for support”.

Students will be asked questions about their motivations for studying courses, what they have done to prepare, and any extenuating circumstances.

Kim Eccleston, head of strategy and reform at Ucas, said in a Higher Education Policy Institute blog post: “We believe this will create a more supportive framework, which in turn will help guide students through their responses by removing the guesswork, as well as capturing the information universities and colleges have told us they really need to know from applicants when it comes to offer-making.”

The changes to the admission process will be introduced no earlier than 2024 for students applying to begin university in 2025.

And in the future, Ucas said that it would consider moving away from written text to multimedia submissions.

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UCAS personal statements are changing: here’s what you need to know

Personal statements as we know them are set to become a thing of the past. UCAS has introduced a new process for applications in 2025.

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The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) has introduced a new process for university applications for 2025, meaning that the process will change in 2025 ready for 2026 entrants.

Personal statements have always been an essential part of the university application process. However, UCAS has decided to scrap personal statements in their traditional form. They will now be replaced by a new three-question structure.

You don't need to worry too much if you’re preparing to apply for university right now. This new structure isn’t coming into play until 2025 when students apply for 2026 entry.

UCAS personal statement changes

What is the new application process?

Currently, to apply to university, you need to write a personal statement which is uploaded to UCAS Hub . Universities you apply to will then read your statement and make their offers from there.

With the new process, things will work a bit differently. You will no longer need to write a detailed personal statement, and will instead need to answer questions related to three key areas.

The key areas are:

  • Motivation for course: Why do you want to study the course?
  • Preparedness for course: How has your learning thus far helped you to be prepared for your course?
  • Preparation through other experiences: What else have you done to help yourself prepare? How and why are these experiences so useful?
  • Extenuating circumstances: Is there anything the university needs to know about you? (optional)

These questions will allow you to present yourself in a way that has more structure than the previous version. While the original question list included longer questions on preparedness for study and preferred learning styles, these questions caused confusion due to different teaching and assessment styles. Because of this, they’ve been removed from the potential questions.

Along with this change, teachers' references will also change to allow for more objective comments.

UCAS application process changes

When does this new process start?

This new process will be introduced in 2025 and take effect for 2026 applicants. Those applying in the 2024 or 2025 admissions cycle will still need to write a personal statement for their application in the current format.

This means the new process will be coming in after January 2025 (October 2024, if you are applying to Oxbridge ).

A personalised tool will also launch later this year. This tool will provide applicants with entry-grade reports that will give students a range of the profiles accepted onto similar courses over a five-year period, using UCAS data.

This process was originally supposed to start in 2024 but after ongoing testing, this has been pushed back. It’s unknown whether the new process will be postponed again for the 2026 admissions cycle.

Why is the process changing?

UCAS has decided to change the university application process based on student feedback. This process will now offer greater support for applicants from different academic backgrounds.

UCAS has recently published their own report on current applications, called the Future of Undergraduate Admissions report. This research discovered that, out of 13,000 polled students, as many as 83% found writing a personal statement to be too stressful, while a further 79% found the statement too difficult to write without appropriate support.

Personal statements were not unpopular, however. 72% of students found that personal statements were essential parts of the university application process. Personal statements allowed students to stand out as more than just application numbers and their grades. However, the question format will allow students to continue to stand out from other applicants.

UCAS personal statement questions

How are teacher references changing?

Teacher references are changing to allow teachers to make more objective comments regarding students. Students can pick current or former academic referees, such as teachers, tutors or head teachers; these referees will then write a full reference about the student's career goals, work experience and predicted grades.

Under the new system, the referee will instead answer three structured questions. In these questions, teachers will include a general statement about the student’s school or college, any extenuating circumstances that could affect the student’s exam performances and any other circumstances the teacher feels the university should be aware of.

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Ucas to replace personal statement with series of questions

Admissions service also making changes to teacher references, and plans to release details of grade profiles that were accepted onto courses.

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ucas personal statement scrap

The Ucas personal statement is to be replaced by a series of questions following concerns that it was too stressful for UK students.

The admissions service said it believes the change to the 4,000 character essay – which had previously been  criticised for contributing to inequalities in higher education access  – will create “a more supportive framework”.

Advocates of reform said the change will help “level the playing field” in university admissions.

The  Future of Undergraduate Admissions report  by Ucas also announced that academic references would become structured questions, and that students will be able to see a range of accepted entry grades for different courses to improve transparency.

A recent Ucas survey found that 83 per cent of students reported the process of writing a personal statement stressful, with 79 per cent saying it is difficult to complete without support.

Based on this feedback, Kim Eccleston, head of strategy and reform at Ucas, says the current format will be reframed into a series of questions focusing on six key areas: motivation for the course, preparedness for the course, preparation through other experiences, extenuating circumstances, preparedness for study, and preferred learning style.

“We believe this will create a more supportive framework which in turn will help guide students through their responses by removing the guesswork, as well as capturing the information universities and colleges have told us they really need to know from applicants when it comes to offer-making”, she writes in a  blog published by the Higher Education Policy Institute .

The questions are set to be introduced in 2024, for students entering higher education in 2025, while Ucas said it paved the way for further enhancements, such as moving to multimedia submissions.

Lee Elliot Major, professor of social mobility at the University of Exeter , said the move to structured questions was “hugely positive”.

“No one should underestimate how important this reform will be in helping to level the playing field in university admissions,” he added.

“I’ve been calling for reform as statements currently add further advantage for middle class applicants who are often given help in filling in their submissions.”

Providers had told Ucas that the subjective nature of the academic reference section – typically filled out by an applicant’s form tutor or careers adviser – made it challenging to be used to compare applicants against each other.

As a result, it will be replaced with three structured questions – a mandatory general statement about the referee’s school, plus optional information sections on extenuating circumstances affecting the applicant’s performance.

Beginning with the 2024 entry cycle, Professor Elliot Major said it will enable more “objective and useful comments from teachers”.

“As we enter an era of increasing competition for the most selective university degree courses, we need more structured and transparent university admissions that are fair and fit for purpose for all,” he added.

In addition, entry grade reports will be available through the Ucas website, which will give a range of grade profiles that have been accepted onto courses over a five-year period.

It said that this personalised tool, which will launch this year, will prompt applicants to dig deeper into entry requirements and re-evaluate options that may have been considered out of reach.

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ucas personal statement scrap

Ucas to scrap personal statements for student applicants

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Admissions body pitches reforms to make admissions process fairer

Students will no longer have to write an essay-style personal statement in their Ucas applications, after the admissions body announced an overhaul to the process.

Ucas said in a report published 12 January, Future of Undergraduate Admissions, that students would answer a series of questions about their reasons for choosing a course instead of writing a personal statement.

There have been concerns that the personal statements disadvantage students who do not have access to good guidance and support when writing the essays, which some feel could “widen the gap” between applicants.

The change comes after scrutiny from the Department for Education on the admissions process. The DfE carried out a consultation on whether to switch to a system of post-qualification admissions in 2021, although it ultimately decided not to continue with the changes.

Writing in a Higher Education Policy Institute blog on 12 January, Ucas head of strategy and reform Kim Eccleston said that “most students are in favour of personal statements” as it gives them the chance to “demonstrate achievements beyond their grades”.

But more than 80 per cent said they found the process of writing the statement stressful, and 79 per cent said the statement is difficult to complete with no support.

Eccleston said the replacement questions will prompt students to write about six areas, including their motivation and preparation for the course and for studying at a higher level, how other experiences have helped to prepare them for university, any extenuating circumstances and their preferred learning style.

“We believe this will create a more supportive framework which in turn will help guide students through their responses by removing the guesswork, as well as capturing the information universities and colleges have told us they really need to know from applicants when it comes to offer-making,” she said.

Once the questions have been finalised, they will replace the personal statement from 2024-25.

The report also revealed that Ucas will introduce reports showing students the range of grades that have been accepted for their chosen course in the past, and it will replace the free text option for referees to comment on students with a series of questions.

It will try to offer students more personalised guidance on what their post-secondary options are, and will launch an Outreach Connection Service designed to help universities and employers in their efforts to improve access and participation.

Ucas consulted with 1,200 students, more than 170 teachers and advisers, 100 universities and colleges and government representatives when creating the report.

In her blog post, Eccleston stressed that “reform is an evolving process”, and she said that Ucas would “keep engaging with the sector to help us shape the delivery of these reforms”—particularly the changes to the personal statement.

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Cambridge welcomes UCAS plan to scrap personal statements

Sam Lucy, Director of Admissions at the University, said the change will ‘mean that less well supported students can engage more effectively with the process’

ucas personal statement scrap

by Nabiha Ahmed

This article is 1 year old

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Personal statements are to be replaced with a set of questions for university hopefuls, the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) have announced this month.

The change will pave the way for bigger amendments to the application process such as multi-media submissions, says UCAS, with The Times reporting that video applications could be introduced.

Sam Lucy, Director of Admissions at the University, told Varsity that she welcomes the revisions, adding that “providing a more structured framework and better guidance to the expectations of universities will give Admissions Tutors more useful information, and will mean that less well supported students can engage more effectively with the process.”

The Future of Undergraduate Admissions report by UCAS, published on 12th January, detailed concerns over support for students writing personal statements being “not universal”. In the same report, UCAS acknowledged that the personal statement has been criticised “as a mechanism to ‘widen the gap’” between students.

The personal statement will be replaced by a series of questions covering six key areas: motivation for the course, preparedness for the course, preparation through other experiences, extenuating circumstances, preparedness for study, and preferred learning style.

UCAS hopes that the questions will “bring focus and clarity for students” and “reduce the need for support”.

The Future of Undergraduate Admissions report also revealed that 83% of students find the process of writing a personal statement stressful and 79% believe that the statement is difficult to complete without support.

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These statistics are supported by a report by The Higher Education Policy Institute (Hepi) from November, which found that the task is an “unnecessary burden” on disadvantaged students and accused the 4,000 character essay of “contributing to inequalities in higher education access”.

Academic references will also be replaced with three structured questions for referees to answer. This comes after schools told UCAS that the ambiguous nature of the academic reference section – usually completed by an applicant’s form tutor or careers advisor – made it challenging to compare applicants against each other.

Alongside these changes, UCAS will introduce ‘Entry Grade Reports’ for applicants. This personalised tool will display the range of grade profiles that have been accepted for entry to courses over a five-year period, aiming to help students evaluate their options and consider courses they previously may not have.

Aside from Entry Grade Reports, which launches this year, all changes are set to be introduced in the 2024 application cycle, for those applying for 2025 entry onwards.

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ucas personal statement scrap

UCAS to scrap personal statement requirement for student applicants

T he Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) has said that students will no longer be required to write a personal statement when applying for higher education.

In a report titled Future of Undergraduate Admissions , which was published on 12 January, UCAS said that students would now answer a series of questions about their reasons for choosing a particular course.

Once the questions have been finalised, they will replace the statement from 2024-25.

It detailed concerns that support for students writing personal statements was “not universal”, and that it favoured privileged students. As a result, UCAS wrote that the personal statement has been criticised “as a mechanism to ‘widen the gap’” between students.

Analysis by the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) in November last year found that writing a statement is an “unnecessary burden” on disadvantaged students, and it said that the 4,000-character essay was a factor “contributing to inequalities in higher education access”.

The personal statement will be replaced by a series of questions covering six key areas: motivation for the course, preparedness for the course, preparation through other experiences, extenuating circumstances, preparedness for study, and preferred learning style.

UCAS said that it hopes that the questions will “bring focus and clarity for students” and “reduce the need for support”.

The report found that 83% of students find the process of writing a personal statement to be stressful , and 79% believe that the statement is difficult to complete without institutional or external support.

UCAS consulted with 1,200 students, more than 170 teachers and advisers, 100 universities and colleges, and government representatives when creating the report.

In February 2022, UCAS announced that it was considering making changes to the application process.

Michelle Donelan, the Universities Minister at the time, said: “I have always felt that personal statements in their current form favour the most advantaged students.

“So I’m pleased that UCAS have confirmed that reform of the personal statement is in their plans so that personal statements work to the benefit of all students.”

The report also revealed that academic references are to be replaced with three structured questions for referees to answer, in order to make it easier to compare applicants against each other.

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The official student newspaper of the University of Glasgow, independently informing since 1932.

ucas personal statement scrap

UCAS could scrap personal statements

  • April 19, 2022
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UCAS is considering moving from the traditional personal statement to a structured set of questions application process.

The UK’s University and College Admissions Service (UCAS) is considering replacing the current personal statement based university application protest with a questions-based structure. The more structured series of questions would still allow students to show creativity but guide their answers with more specific criteria. This would affect applications for most UK higher education institutions.

This move was announced as part of wider changes in the way universities admit students to increase fairness between social groups. Other considerations included allowing students to apply to university after getting their grades, rather than pre-emptively. This is thought to increase pupils’ choices and expand them to horizons they had previously not considered. 

“ Other considerations included allowing students to apply to university after getting their grades, rather than pre-emptively.”

The current personal statement system is believed to be advantageous to more affluent students with a network of teachers, parents and tutors who can help them perfect their statements. This was expressed by Universities Minister Michelle Donelan at a recent speech for a UCAS event, where she stated that she believed: “Personal statements in their current form favour the most advantaged students.”

The head of UCAS, Clare Marchant expressed wishes to “simplify the process, offer greater guidance and help students from all backgrounds have an equal level of support”.

However, many in higher education still see the benefits of personal statements. In a government consultation, 28% of respondents in the higher education stakeholder group said they were not sure whether personal statements should be removed, with 53% believing they should stay. Further response analysis showed that while those consulted were concerned about disparities, they also highlighted the benefit personal statements give pupils. These included less stress, with pupils being judged holistically, and space to reflect on career goals and motivations, improving decision-making skills.

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UCAS set to replace personal statements from 2024

ucas personal statement scrap

13th January 2023

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The university application landscape seems set for reform according to reports this morning. UCAS wants to replace a unified personal statement with a series of six questions. Admissions service are also making changes to teacher references, and plans to release details of grade profiles that were accepted onto specific courses. The changes may arrive for the cohort applying in the autumn of 2024.

This might be worth a read:

Five steps UCAS is taking to reform the undergraduate admissions process

The newly published UCAS report is available here

Initial reaction from Geoff Barton here

‘Breaking down the personal statement into specific questions feels to be a step towards a simplified, fairer application process,’ says @RealGeoffBarton of @ucas_online announcement https://t.co/kwseX9NSZQ — Tes (@tes) January 12, 2023

No doubt a huge amount will be said and written as the consultation process gathers momentum. The six question approach appears rather prescriptive and there will be plenty of discussion I feel about the last question on preferred learning styles!

And in a month when ChatGPT and other emerging AI tools have dominated the education headlines, what price that these AI bots will be able to generate convincing written responses in seconds?

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UCAS to Scrap Personal Statements from Next Year | This Week in Admissions News

UCAS to Scrap Personal Statements from Next Year | This Week in Admissions News

The world of college admissions is ever-changing and for students with top university ambitions, it’s important to stay up-to-date on the latest developments. This week, UCAS announced that it will be scrapping the long personal statement as part of its wider reforms to admissions testing, while Harvard Medical School pulled out of the US News rankings. Check back next week to see what’s new and noteworthy in university admissions!

Ucas to scrap personal statements from next year.

Applications to Cambridge are set to change from the 2024 admissions cycle as UCAS has announced they will be scrapping the personal statement. The 4,000-character essay will be scrapped and replaced with a series of questions about the higher education course a student is applying for. The change comes amid claims that the personal statements favour middle-class students who may have better access to “high-quality advice and guidance”, according to Ucas, the Evening Standard reported.

The structured questions aim to “bring focus and clarity for students, reducing the need for support”. Kim Eccleston, head of strategy and reform at Ucas, said: “We believe this will create a more supportive framework, which in turn will help guide students through their responses by removing the guesswork, as well as capturing the information universities and colleges have told us they really need to know from applicants when it comes to offer-making.”

Cambridge had announced earlier in the year that they will be making some changes to their admissions testing as they were operationally unsustainable and “to deliver them affordably to students and higher education institutions.” The elite university has seen a drop in enrollment as well as applications over the last couple of years, owing to the Covid pandemic as well as an economic downturn in the UK.

Here are the changes we can expect in the UCAS from the 2024/25 admissions cycle:

  • The 4,000-character personal statement essay will be scrapped and replaced with a series of questions about the higher education course a student is applying for
  • Several university admissions exams, including BMAT (medicine), ENGAA (engineering), NSAA (natural sciences) and TMUA (mathematical skills) tests, will be discontinued
  • The seven UK medical schools that use BMAT tests as part of their admissions process (Brighton and Sussex, Imperial, Lancaster, UCL, Cambridge, Leeds and Oxford) as well as medical and healthcare schools in other countries will put alternative arrangements in place

It should be interesting to see how the spread of AI will affect the college essay and personal statements. All of these changes are set to take effect from the 2024 admissions cycle - the 2023 cycle will continue as before. 

Other top stories in admissions news this week:

  • Harvard Medical School announced it will no longer submit data to U.S. News & World Report for its “best medical schools” rankings. The decision was made due to concerns that the rankings create incentives for institutions to report inaccurate data and that the suitability of a medical school for a student is too complex to be reflected in a ranked list. This move follows the withdrawal of Harvard and Yale law schools (among other top schools) from the rankings in November, and is a reflection of the growing trend of elite institutions devaluing the importance of these rankings, which have traditionally played a significant role in shaping the decisions of prospective students.
  • According to Times Higher Education , the Biden administration is planning to publish a list of programs/degrees that are considered to have low financial value for students. However, there is currently a lack of consensus on how to determine the economic worth of these programs. Amy Ellen Duke-Benfield, managing director of policy and research at Higher Learning Advocates, suggests that the department should consider metrics such as job opportunities for graduates and whether they possess the skills sought by employers when determining the list of programs.
  • The PIE News writes on a new report from the Conference Board of Canada that highlights the need for a comprehensive strategy for the immigration and settlement of international students. The report states that despite the priority of Canadian stakeholders to retain international students after their studies, the government currently lacks a plan to effectively coordinate the granting of permits and selection of international students for immigration. The current lack of strategy creates friction for international students, and this problem could worsen as the growth in international student enrollment surpasses the planned increase in permanent immigration.
  • English-language skills in China have slipped, according to a global proficiency ranking , especially among young Chinese, and some are blaming rising nationalism. The 2022 English Proficiency Index ranked China at 62, a low proficiency nation, down from a moderate proficiency ranking of 49 in 2021 and 38 in 2020. China lagged behind Singapore, the Philippines, Malaysia and Hong Kong, the latter of which has remained a high proficiency economy over the past three years. According to the report, education reforms in China over the past few years have led to a reduction in the time spent in schools teaching and speaking English.

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UCAS set to replace Personal statements with video questionaires

January 13, 2023 //  by  ThomasPayne

6th form students working in class.

Personal statements are set to become a thing of the past as UCAS look to replace them with video questionnaires. This allow applicants a more “personal” rather than “academic” form to express themselves in.

Backlash has rippled across the country, as the replacement for personal statements has been depicted to benefit more privileged and upper class students when applying for their chosen university.

Students working on their personal statements.

Will Rodwell, a blogger and student at Bournemouth university had much to say about the decision made by UCAS. Will has previously created a blog post labelled “My advice for writing your personal statement.”

The student said he is not a fan of UCAS changing their procedures within the application as it can hinder those with “technological incapabilities” and that there are always people that would find it “unfair.”

He also stated that those with “learning difficulties” can struggle with adaptation to the video format.

On the other hand, Tracey Howard, Manager of 6th form had said that it “can only be beneficial” to the students applying.

She defended UCAS’s decisions wholeheartedly as she said: “What you can write about is limited, when doing a an interview it gives you more chance to express yourself.”

Although the issue, seems to be mainly that it can create a gap in social classes and can propose problems for those who suffer with issues such as social anxiety.

Tracey added: “The 6th form would prepare for these instances…that student will then feel confident that they have worked with their college to get that stuff out.”

The contrast is significant between a student that has recently applied for university and someone who is preparing students to apply for their next step into education.

Out with the old and in with the new seems to be the way forward, but what are your thoughts on this situation?

ucas personal statement scrap

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UCAS to Scrap Personal Statements

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) has announced plans to remove a central part of the application process – the personal statement – and replace it with a series of questions for prospective students. According to UCAS, this change is the start of a broader series of reforms.

The Future of Undergraduate Admissions report, released by UCAS on Thursday 12 January, has revealed changes to the application process after 83% of applicants surveyed reported that the process of writing their personal statement – a free text opportunity for students to demonstrate their skill and passion for the courses they are applying to – was stress inducing.

Furthermore, 79% of those surveyed agreed that the statement was difficult to complete without support, leading some commentators to view the process as a “mechanism to widen the gap”.

As a replacement for the personal statement, UCAS have identified six key areas that admissions departments are interested in: motivation for course, preparedness for course, preparation through other experiences, extenuating circumstances, preparedness for study, and preferred learning styles. These areas will be formulated into targeted questions for students to answer, rather than the current, more generalised approach.

UCAS have confirmed that these areas will continue to be refined with the help of both applicants and education providers.

According to UCAS, both students and providers (both universities and colleges across the UK), have “identified a preference for structured questions that bring focus and clarity for students, reducing the need for support. This approach also supports comparability for providers.

Students who have completed the UCAS process in the past have reflected on how these changes would have been beneficial to their own university application experience.

“The personal statement was definitely the most troubling part of the UCAS process,” Luke, a second-year student, told The Saint.

“If [UCAS] had made it more structured, I would have had a lot less stress during the end of schooling”.

International students here at the University of St Andrews are also welcoming the change. “I found the personal statement difficult because it was nothing like what I had to do for applications in my own country,” Emily, a first-year international student, said.

“I wouldn’t have been able to do it without the help of tutors I found who had done UCAS before. We had regular meetings just to make sure my statement would be competitive. It added a lot of stress”.

The personal statement section is only the start for changes in the UCAS process; references and grade reporting are also being altered based on feedback provided by those involved.

UCAS have announced changes to the academic referee portion of the application, similar to changes being made within the personal statement section. Instead of a free text approach where referees are given the opportunity to promote their students’ prospects, referees are given “three structured questions” to answer, so that providers are more able to find information required for selections.

The three questions relate to the school or college of the applicant, extenuating circumstances that may affect the applicant’s performance, and a final section to provide any information that the referee “thinks that universities/colleges should be made aware of”.

‘Entry Grade Reports’ are also being built into the UCAS online platform. The feature will make it easier for students to locate courses where entry would be achievable based on their secondary school grades. According to the Future of Undergraduate Admissions Report, “these reports will give visibility of the range of grade profiles that have been accepted for entry to courses over a five-year period”.

UCAS are welcoming ongoing input from both students and providers on the proposed changes. Surveys and opportunities for input are available on the UCAS website.

The University of St Andrews declined to comment on the changes to the application process.

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It would be difficult for me to write such a personal statement. Quite recently, I asked https://residencypersonalstatements.net/ for help in writing one. And I think I still would.

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UCAS Scraps The Personal Statement: Farewell To An Old Friend

Posted by Naomi | Jan 16, 2023 | | 0 -->

ucas personal statement scrap

The past few years have represented significant upheaval for anyone involved in education.

For students, that has meant teacher assessment for grades, and heavily disrupted exam periods, not to mention the bulk of their tuition taking place online. Particularly badly affected were the students for whom access to higher education might already have represented a skewed and uneven playing field.

For those students – and in fact, for all university applicants – the news that the 4000 character/47 line UCAS personal statement will be radically overhauled for 2024 entrants onwards has been generally welcomed by students, teachers and universities.

The personal statement has always presented difficulties for students who might be academically able, but who are yet to find their own personal voice.

It has been worse still for those without access – financially or logistically – to the extracurricular activities that stuff the personal statements of their peers. Often from families where they might be the first to go on to degree level study, filling those 47 lines with information about why they are suitable can seem an impossible hurdle.

Other groups who have traditionally had difficulties with the statement are neurodiverse students who might require educational support. The kind of free and personal writing required can seem particularly difficult for students who respond best to structure and clear questions.

The personal statement has naturally favoured those whose families can either advise from personal experience, or who can afford coaching or editing services for the personal statement as well as additional academic support. For those who look to acquire knowledge rather than musical, scouting or volunteer achievements, it can seem to them as if they have nothing to say.

The Universities UK Fair Admissions Code of Practice has found that the statement in its current form is incompatible with its aims to level the playing field for all applicants.

No matter how able the student, over 80% of drafted statements failed to supply opinions backed up by evidence on the student’s chosen academic topics. At least 35% failed to organise their statement with any coherence or effectiveness at all (the skills required for the personal statement tend not to be acquired until the second or even third year of university study).

Grammatical skill also seemed to depart, even amongst the students that would normally score highly in this area. In other words, even those who might be expected to fare well, fared less well than they might think. In an academic year where time is precious – either for study or necessary recreation – an application necessity which can take the time equivalent of a working week to complete is ripe for change.

How were the changes to the UCAS appication process decided?

Ucas consulted with 1,200 students, 170 teachers, and more than 100 universities and colleges before making the reforms, as reported by The Times.

According to UCAS, although 72% of respondents surveyed felt positive about the personal statement, 79% agreed that writing the statement is difficult to complete without support, and 83% said they found the process of writing a personal statement stressful.

The structured questions aim to “bring focus and clarity for students, reducing the need for support”. Kim Eccleston, Head of Strategy and Reform at UCAS, said: “We believe this will create a more supportive framework, which in turn will help guide students through their responses by removing the guesswork, as well as capturing the information universities and colleges have told us they really need to know from applicants when it comes to offer-making.”

What will replace the personal statement?

The personal statement won’t disappear altogether, and nor should it – getting a flavour of the person behind the student is important to admissions officers. Indeed, this is why Studential was set up in the first place - to support students with this exercise and make sure they present themselves in the best possible light to prospective universities .

However, a series of structured questions which require shorter responses, and which by their nature will guide the applicant to a more relevant and revealing demonstration of their suitability for a course of academic study, will help both student and selection panel.

The questions will be about the course the student has applied for, so should present a more equal platform. UCAS have stated that the areas these questions might cover include:

  • Motivation for the course
  • How prepared you are for the course academically
  • How any experiences might have prepared you for a degree
  • Extentuating circumstances
  • Preferred learning style.

In addition, teachers will receive more guidance on how to write references for students, and several university entrance exams will be scrapped, including those for medicine, engineering, natural sciences and mathematical skills. However, some institutions will maintain the BMAT (medicine) element, so it’s worth checking first.

However, as students find their way back through the disruption of post-pandemic fallout, the introduction of structure into one more area of their academic life can only be welcome.

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Going through school and applying to university myself in 2002, I know how difficult it can be to make the right choices regarding your academic journey, especially when you're uncertain of where you want to be in the future.

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Ucas scraps personal statements for university applicants

ucas personal statement scrap

A video message could soon replace the personal statement, the university admissions body said as it announced it was scrapping the written essay.

Candidates have a blank space on university application forms which they can fill with up to 4,000 characters. Ucas said that from 2024 they will instead respond to questions that will guide them to support their application in the right way.

Social mobility experts have campaigned for change and said personal statements were “barometers of middle-class privilege” because wealthier teenagers had tailored help. Numerous companies offer their services and private school sixth forms have specialists to help pupils.

Ucas is making the changes after a consultation with 1,200 students, 170 teachers and more than 100 universities and colleges.

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UCAS scraps personal statements

ucas personal statement scrap

In an attempt to reform university and college admission procedures, UCAS has announced it will scrap the 4,000-character personal statement that all students had to write. Instead, applicants will answer a series of short questions from the 2024 admissions cycle.

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) is making several changes to its admissions process from the 2024 cycle. Scrapping personal statements is one of the most significant changes.

UCAS announced in a report published 12 January, Future of Undergraduate Admissions, that students would answer a series of questions about their reasons for choosing a course instead of writing a personal statement.

The change comes after concerns that personal statements disadvantage students who do not have access to guidance and support when writing the essays, which some feel could “widen the gap” between applicants.

Whilst making the decision, UCAS consulted with 1,200 students, 170 teachers, and more than 100 universities and colleges, as reported by The Times.

According to UCAS, although 72% of respondents surveyed felt positive about the personal statement, 79% agreed that writing the statement is difficult to complete without support, and 83% said they found the process of writing a personal statement stressful.

The introduction of the structured questions aim to “bring focus and clarity for students, reducing the need for support”.

Kim Eccleston, Head of Strategy and Reform at UCAS, said: “We believe this will create a more supportive framework, which in turn will help guide students through their responses by removing the guesswork, as well as capturing the information universities and colleges have told us they really need to know from applicants when it comes to offer-making.”

What changes can we expect from the 2024/25 admissions cycle?

  • The 4,000-character personal statement essay will be scrapped and replaced with a series of questions about the higher education course a student is applying for
  • Several university admissions exams, including ENGAA (engineering) and TMUA (mathematical skills) tests, will be discontinued

So far there is some speculation on what format of testing will replace the exams that are being scrapped.

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University personal statements to be changed 'as they favour middle-class'

Would-be undergraduates will be asked to give responses to a series of short questions, rather than writing a 47-line essay

University personal statements will be scrapped in their current form amid claims they give middle-class teenagers an advantage .

Pupils applying for undergraduate degrees will no longer have to write a 47-line essay explaining why they are so passionate about the subject they wish to study.

Instead, they will be asked to answer a series of short responses to questions on topics such as their motivation for studying courses, why they are ready to succeed, and any extenuating circumstances that would help put their achievements into context. 

Prof Lee Elliot Major, a social mobility expert at the University of Exeter, said: “No one should underestimate how important this reform will be in helping to level the playing field in university admissions. 

“I’ve been calling for reform as statements currently add further advantage for middle-class applicants, who are often given help in filling in their submissions.”

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (Ucas) said it was reforming the admissions process amid “fears that students who do not have access to high-quality advice and guidance will not be able to use the statement to shine in the same way that their more advantaged peers can”. 

The reforms will be introduced no earlier than 2024 for 2025 applicants. 

Ucas said that in future years, it would consider moving away from written responses entirely and replacing them with multi-media submissions. 

New questions 'limited' in depth

A Ucas survey last year found that 72 per cent of students felt positive about personal statements . 

However, 83 per cent said they found it stressful and 79 per cent agreed that the statement is difficult to complete without support.  

Barnaby Lenon, dean of the University of Buckingham and chairman of the Independent Schools Council, said: “It is a great relief that Ucas have decided to retain the personal statement - the only opportunity the student has to express themselves on the university application form.”

He said that questions proposed by Ucas were “limited compared to the depth of questions asked by American universities”, with no mentions of the pupil’s interests or achievements. 

“This reflects the fact that American universities are interested in the whole person, not just their academic background,” he said.

Ucas is facing criticism for suggesting that students could be asked to state their preferred "learning styles", and how the courses they have applied for reflect that.

Mr Lenon said: “The sixth question about ‘preferred learning styles’ is a blunder, because research over the past 15 years has shown that learning styles do not really exist.”

Nick Hillman, director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, said: “What people think is their learning style, when you test it out, is often very different to how they actually learn. We all learn in all the various ways of learning. So it just feels a bit outdated.”

Ucas said it will continue to refine the questions before they are formally introduced.

The Unique Burial of a Child of Early Scythian Time at the Cemetery of Saryg-Bulun (Tuva)

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Pages:  379-406

In 1988, the Tuvan Archaeological Expedition (led by M. E. Kilunovskaya and V. A. Semenov) discovered a unique burial of the early Iron Age at Saryg-Bulun in Central Tuva. There are two burial mounds of the Aldy-Bel culture dated by 7th century BC. Within the barrows, which adjoined one another, forming a figure-of-eight, there were discovered 7 burials, from which a representative collection of artifacts was recovered. Burial 5 was the most unique, it was found in a coffin made of a larch trunk, with a tightly closed lid. Due to the preservative properties of larch and lack of air access, the coffin contained a well-preserved mummy of a child with an accompanying set of grave goods. The interred individual retained the skin on his face and had a leather headdress painted with red pigment and a coat, sewn from jerboa fur. The coat was belted with a leather belt with bronze ornaments and buckles. Besides that, a leather quiver with arrows with the shafts decorated with painted ornaments, fully preserved battle pick and a bow were buried in the coffin. Unexpectedly, the full-genomic analysis, showed that the individual was female. This fact opens a new aspect in the study of the social history of the Scythian society and perhaps brings us back to the myth of the Amazons, discussed by Herodotus. Of course, this discovery is unique in its preservation for the Scythian culture of Tuva and requires careful study and conservation.

Keywords: Tuva, Early Iron Age, early Scythian period, Aldy-Bel culture, barrow, burial in the coffin, mummy, full genome sequencing, aDNA

Information about authors: Marina Kilunovskaya (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Candidate of Historical Sciences. Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail: [email protected] Vladimir Semenov (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Candidate of Historical Sciences. Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail: [email protected] Varvara Busova  (Moscow, Russian Federation).  (Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation). Institute for the History of Material Culture of the Russian Academy of Sciences.  Dvortsovaya Emb., 18, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Kharis Mustafin  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Candidate of Technical Sciences. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Irina Alborova  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Candidate of Biological Sciences. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected] Alina Matzvai  (Moscow, Russian Federation). Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.  Institutsky Lane, 9, Dolgoprudny, 141701, Moscow Oblast, Russian Federation E-mail:  [email protected]

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Savvino-storozhevsky monastery and museum.

Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery and Museum

Zvenigorod's most famous sight is the Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery, which was founded in 1398 by the monk Savva from the Troitse-Sergieva Lavra, at the invitation and with the support of Prince Yury Dmitrievich of Zvenigorod. Savva was later canonised as St Sabbas (Savva) of Storozhev. The monastery late flourished under the reign of Tsar Alexis, who chose the monastery as his family church and often went on pilgrimage there and made lots of donations to it. Most of the monastery’s buildings date from this time. The monastery is heavily fortified with thick walls and six towers, the most impressive of which is the Krasny Tower which also serves as the eastern entrance. The monastery was closed in 1918 and only reopened in 1995. In 1998 Patriarch Alexius II took part in a service to return the relics of St Sabbas to the monastery. Today the monastery has the status of a stauropegic monastery, which is second in status to a lavra. In addition to being a working monastery, it also holds the Zvenigorod Historical, Architectural and Art Museum.

Belfry and Neighbouring Churches

ucas personal statement scrap

Located near the main entrance is the monastery's belfry which is perhaps the calling card of the monastery due to its uniqueness. It was built in the 1650s and the St Sergius of Radonezh’s Church was opened on the middle tier in the mid-17th century, although it was originally dedicated to the Trinity. The belfry's 35-tonne Great Bladgovestny Bell fell in 1941 and was only restored and returned in 2003. Attached to the belfry is a large refectory and the Transfiguration Church, both of which were built on the orders of Tsar Alexis in the 1650s.  

ucas personal statement scrap

To the left of the belfry is another, smaller, refectory which is attached to the Trinity Gate-Church, which was also constructed in the 1650s on the orders of Tsar Alexis who made it his own family church. The church is elaborately decorated with colourful trims and underneath the archway is a beautiful 19th century fresco.

Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral

ucas personal statement scrap

The Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral is the oldest building in the monastery and among the oldest buildings in the Moscow Region. It was built between 1404 and 1405 during the lifetime of St Sabbas and using the funds of Prince Yury of Zvenigorod. The white-stone cathedral is a standard four-pillar design with a single golden dome. After the death of St Sabbas he was interred in the cathedral and a new altar dedicated to him was added.

ucas personal statement scrap

Under the reign of Tsar Alexis the cathedral was decorated with frescoes by Stepan Ryazanets, some of which remain today. Tsar Alexis also presented the cathedral with a five-tier iconostasis, the top row of icons have been preserved.

Tsaritsa's Chambers

ucas personal statement scrap

The Nativity of Virgin Mary Cathedral is located between the Tsaritsa's Chambers of the left and the Palace of Tsar Alexis on the right. The Tsaritsa's Chambers were built in the mid-17th century for the wife of Tsar Alexey - Tsaritsa Maria Ilinichna Miloskavskaya. The design of the building is influenced by the ancient Russian architectural style. Is prettier than the Tsar's chambers opposite, being red in colour with elaborately decorated window frames and entrance.

ucas personal statement scrap

At present the Tsaritsa's Chambers houses the Zvenigorod Historical, Architectural and Art Museum. Among its displays is an accurate recreation of the interior of a noble lady's chambers including furniture, decorations and a decorated tiled oven, and an exhibition on the history of Zvenigorod and the monastery.

Palace of Tsar Alexis

ucas personal statement scrap

The Palace of Tsar Alexis was built in the 1650s and is now one of the best surviving examples of non-religious architecture of that era. It was built especially for Tsar Alexis who often visited the monastery on religious pilgrimages. Its most striking feature is its pretty row of nine chimney spouts which resemble towers.

ucas personal statement scrap

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COMMENTS

  1. Will Ucas scrap personal statements?

    In January 2023, Ucas published plans to replace the current free-form personal statement with a series of questions. At that time, the admissions service had suggested the changes could be in place as early as 2024. But Ucas interim CEO Sander Kristel tells The Uni Guide the removal of the current personal statement requirement will now happen ...

  2. UCAS Personal Statements Are Changing in 2025

    Since 1993, UCAS has required university applicants in the UK to submit a 4,000-character Personal Statement during the application process, which would then be accessed by university admissions teams to assist in the shortlisting process. However, it has been confirmed by UCAS that this process will be changing as soon as 2025.

  3. Personal statements for 2026 entry onwards

    When surveyed during the research phases of the proposed personal statement changes, over half the students UCAS spoke to found completing the three questions "very easy" or "easy". Admissions teams said it made it easier for them to assess applications and more confident that they will receive the information they need to make decisions.

  4. Personal statements will not be changing for 2024 entry

    The Future of Undergraduate Admissions report highlights UCAS' continued engagement and ongoing progress with admission reform, including: references. personal statements. grades on entry. personalisation. widening access and participation. Read the report here (3.38 MB). If you have any questions, comments or thoughts regarding potential ...

  5. UCAS ditching personal statement for university entry

    Seren Morris January 13, 2023. The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service ( Ucas) will no longer require students to write a personal statement when applying for university. The change comes ...

  6. UCAS Personal Statements Are Changing

    The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) has introduced a new process for university applications for 2025, meaning that the process will change in 2025 ready for 2026 entrants. Personal statements have always been an essential part of the university application process. However, UCAS has decided to scrap personal statements in ...

  7. Ucas replaces personal statement with questions

    The Ucas personal statement is to be replaced by a series of questions following concerns that it was too stressful for UK students.. The admissions service said it believes the change to the 4,000 character essay - which had previously been criticised for contributing to inequalities in higher education access - will create "a more supportive framework".

  8. Ucas to scrap personal statements for student applicants

    Ucas to scrap personal statements for student applicants. Admissions body pitches reforms to make admissions process fairer. Students will no longer have to write an essay-style personal statement in their Ucas applications, after the admissions body announced an overhaul to the process. Ucas said in a report published 12 January, Future of ...

  9. Cambridge welcomes UCAS plan to scrap personal statements

    Wednesday January 18 2023, 10:06am. Personal statements are to be replaced with a set of questions for university hopefuls, the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) have announced this month. The change will pave the way for bigger amendments to the application process such as multi-media submissions, says UCAS, with The Times ...

  10. UCAS to scrap personal statement requirement for student applicants

    UCAS said that it hopes that the questions will "bring focus and clarity for students" and "reduce the need for support". The report found that 83% of students find the process of writing a personal statement to be stressful, and 79% believe that the statement is difficult to complete without institutional or external support.

  11. UCAS could scrap personal statements

    UCAS could scrap personal statements. UCAS is considering moving from the traditional personal statement to a structured set of questions application process. The UK's University and College Admissions Service (UCAS) is considering replacing the current personal statement based university application protest with a questions-based structure.

  12. UCAS set to replace personal statements from 2024

    The university application landscape seems set for reform according to reports this morning. UCAS wants to replace a unified personal statement with a series of six questions. Admissions service are also making changes to teacher references, and plans to release details of grade profiles that were accepted onto specific courses. The changes may arrive for the cohort applying in the autumn of 2024.

  13. UCAS to Scrap Personal Statements from Next Year

    Applications to Cambridge are set to change from the 2024 admissions cycle as UCAS has announced they will be scrapping the personal statement. The 4,000-character essay will be scrapped and replaced with a series of questions about the higher education course a student is applying for. The change comes amid claims that the personal statements ...

  14. UCAS set to replace Personal statements with video questionaires

    Personal statements are set to become a thing of the past as UCAS look to replace them with video questionnaires. This allow applicants a more "personal" rather than "academic" form to express themselves in. Backlash has rippled across the country, as the replacement for personal statements has been depicted to benefit more privileged ...

  15. UCAS to Scrap Personal Statements

    The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) has announced plans to remove a central part of the application process - the personal statement - and replace it with a series of questions for prospective students. According to UCAS, this change is the start of a broader series of reforms. The Future of Undergraduate Admissions report, released by UCAS on Thursday 12 January, has ...

  16. UCAS Scraps The Personal Statement: Farewell To An Old Friend

    Ucas consulted with 1,200 students, 170 teachers, and more than 100 universities and colleges before making the reforms, as reported by The Times. According to UCAS, although 72% of respondents surveyed felt positive about the personal statement, 79% agreed that writing the statement is difficult to complete without support, and 83% said they ...

  17. Ucas scraps personal statements for university applicants

    A video message could soon replace the personal statement, the university admissions body said as it announced it was scrapping the written essay. Candidates have a blank space on university application forms which they can fill with up to 4,000 characters. Ucas said that from 2024 they will instead respond to questions that will guide them to ...

  18. UCAS scraps personal statements

    UCAS scraps personal statements. 16th January 2023 by Kiera Sowery. In an attempt to reform university and college admission procedures, UCAS has announced it will scrap the 4,000-character personal statement that all students had to write. Instead, applicants will answer a series of short questions from the 2024 admissions cycle.

  19. University personal statements to be changed 'as they ...

    A Ucas survey last year found that 72 per cent of students felt positive about personal statements. However, 83 per cent said they found it stressful and 79 per cent agreed that the statement is ...

  20. How To Write Your Undergraduate Personal Statement

    Just start by showing your enthusiasm for the subject, showcasing your knowledge and understanding, and sharing your ambitions of what you want to achieve. Avoid cliches! Remember, this opening part is simply about introducing yourself, so let the admissions tutor reading your personal statement get to know you. Keep it relevant and simple.

  21. File:Location of Sergiyev Posad Region (Moscow Oblast).svg

    Main page; Contents; Current events; Random article; About Wikipedia; Contact us; Donate; Pages for logged out editors learn more

  22. Subject tasters

    Our initial focus is on bringing Subject tasters to UCAS, enabling you to explore university courses before applying. Over the next few months, we'll introduce Virtual Work Experience and new features to help you reference Springpod experiences on your personal statement.

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    Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts.A copy of the license is included in the section entitled GNU Free Documentation License.

  24. The Unique Burial of a Child of Early Scythian Time at the Cemetery of

    Burial 5 was the most unique, it was found in a coffin made of a larch trunk, with a tightly closed lid. Due to the preservative properties of larch and lack of air access, the coffin contained a well-preserved mummy of a child with an accompanying set of grave goods. The interred individual retained the skin on his face and had a leather ...

  25. Parent, Guardian and Carer Guide

    Download our free guide, containing everything you need to support a young person with their options and decision-making, and help them through the UCAS application process. We cover everything from personal statements to student finance, apprenticeships, accommodation, and results day advice so you can feel well-informed, whatever your child ...

  26. Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery and Museum

    Zvenigorod's most famous sight is the Savvino-Storozhevsky Monastery, which was founded in 1398 by the monk Savva from the Troitse-Sergieva Lavra, at the invitation and with the support of Prince Yury Dmitrievich of Zvenigorod. Savva was later canonised as St Sabbas (Savva) of Storozhev. The monastery late flourished under the reign of Tsar ...