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120 amazing latin american research paper topics.

January 2, 2020

Do you have the task of writing a Latin American research paper? The first step is coming up with a great topic. This is one of the major challenges for most students. But you do not need to worry anymore because we are here to help. Here are the best 120 Latin American research topics that you can consider.

latin american research paper topics

Mixed Latin American Research Paper Topics

  • A closer look at the history of the church and human rights in Latin America.
  • An in-depth analysis of Latin American feminist theology.
  • Exploring the women’s rights in Latin America: A case study of Peru and Colombia.
  • Analyzing the implications of foreign debt on Latin America countries.
  • The impact of the Cold War on Latin America.
  • Analyzing the commonest management styles in Latin American companies.
  • Discuss the main components of Latino culture.
  • Analyzing key economic challenges affecting economic development in Latin America.
  • Impact of outside trading forces on Latin America development.
  • Significance of tourism in Latin America.
  • Analyzing social, political trends in Latin America: A case study of Argentina and Cuba.
  • Evaluate the role played by the military in Latin America studies.
  • Analyzing the first contact between early Spanish settlers and Latin Americans.
  • Meso American civilizations: A case study of Maya civilization.
  • Implications of music on Latino children: A case study of salsa music.
  • Modernism in South America.
  • The history of the Panama Canal.
  • Political consequences of Neo-Liberalism in South America.
  • Analyzing the invention of Latin America.
  • Taking a closer look at the new age of Latin America.
  • Evaluating US involvement in Latin America.

Latin America Research Topics about Brazil

  • Analyzing the cultural relations between Brazil and the US.
  • A closer look at the evolution of Brazil culture.
  • Evaluating the different governments of Brazil.
  • The economy of Brazil during the Cold War.
  • The influence of the Roman Catholic Church in Brazil.
  • Discuss the importance of Brazil’s rainforest in addressing global warming.
  • Comparing Brazil and the US education systems.
  • Comparing the Indian and Brazilian economies.
  • Brazil and global economics: A Closer look at Brazil Role in the BRICS.
  • Neo-liberalism IN Brazil: What are the consequences?
  • The Brazil’s quest for autonomy: Analyzing Brazil’s foreign policy under President Lula.
  • Urban poverty in Rio.

Latin American Topics about Costa Rica

  • Evaluating the business climate in Costa Rica.
  • A closer look at Costa Rica’s economic challenges in the Cold War era.
  • A comprehensive analysis of Costa Rica’s economic performance.
  • Efforts to address global warming in Costa Rica: A case study of Klinki Forestry Project.
  • Analyzing the main problems facing Costa Rica.
  • Deforestation in Costa Rica.
  • Tourism in Costa Rica.
  • Comparing the history of coffee in Costa Rica and Brazil.
  • Analyzing contemporary issues in Costa Rica Tourism.
  • Analyzing the main exports and imports of Costa Rica.
  • A closer look at key political issues in Costa Rica.
  • Comparing culture and ethics in Costa Rica and Mexico.
  • What is the future of Costa Rica’s economic growth?

Unique Latin American Research Topics

  • Effects of El Nino in South America.
  • The relationship between Argentina’s economy and the black market.
  • Key elements of Argentina’s democracy.
  • Analyzing the sexual behavior of Amazon people.
  • The history of Chile’s economic growth.
  • Comparing the economic growths of Chile and Mexico.
  • Analyzing the persistence of drug lords in Colombia.
  • What implications does drug trafficking have on the Colombian economy?
  • Comparing the education system of Peru and Brazil.
  • The effect of remittance in Latin America economy.
  • History of slavery in South America.
  • Democracy in Latin America.
  • A closer look at enlightenment in Latin America.
  • Analyzing independent movements in Latin America
  • Analyzing Latin America after the end of the Wars of Independence.

Latin American Topics on the Caribbean

  • Evaluating the significance of Grenada Island during the Cold War.
  • Comparing the ethnic slave rebellion in Bahia and Caribbean.
  • Comparing the history of slavery in the Caribbean and the US.
  • A review of the Haiti revolution.
  • Highlighting the struggles of Marielitos.
  • A closer look at socioeconomic struggles in Barbados.
  • Analyzing the problem of racism in Cuba.
  • A closer look at the history of Haiti between 1843 and 1973.
  • Analyzing the US involvement in Haiti in the early 20 th century.

Latin American Research Paper Topics about Cuba

  • Analyzing music development in Cuba.
  • What factors drive Cubans to immigrate to the US?
  • Analyzing the Aesthetic beauty of Cuba.
  • Comparing slavery in Virginia, the USA with Slavery in Cuba.
  • What is Fidel Castro’s greatest social economic contribution to Cuba?
  • Comparing the Cuban and Brazilian economies.
  • What are the key cultural similarities between Cuban and Americans?
  • Evaluating the economic performance of Cuba after World War II.
  • A closer look at the medical industry in Cuba.
  • What is the future of Cuban economic growth?

Latin America Topics about Guatemala

  • Analyzing the performance of Guatemala economy after the Cold War.
  • A review of Guatemala’s attitudes towards Axis and Allied powers in the World War II.
  • Comparing Guatemala and Costa Rica’s coffee management processes.
  • A review of Guatemala’s trade relationships with the US.
  • Analyzing the sufferings and abuses of Guatemala’s children during the country’s civil wars.
  • Guatemala history: Evaluating the fall of President Arbenz.
  • Comparing the culture of Guatemalans and Brazilians.
  • Analyzing the Guatemala government’s efforts on conservation.

Latin America Research Topics on Mexico

  • What are the main challenges of the Mexico’s education system?
  • Analyzing the Zapatista Revolution.
  • Was the 1914-1916 Woodrow Wilson’s intervention in Mexico Justified?
  • The colonization of Texas by Mexico.
  • Comparing the Mexican art of the 19 th and 20 th centuries.
  • Analyzing the hybrid Mexico culture.
  • What are the key success factors of the 1990s Mexican film success?
  • Comparing the Mexican and US culture: What are the key differences?
  • A closer look at the economic performance of Mexico after the Cold War?
  • Illegal Mexican immigrants.
  • Should the US use a more protected border with Mexico?
  • The history of Aztec Empire.
  • What is the future of Mexico economy?
  • Analyzing the major problems that Mexico experienced under the leadership of President Zedillo.
  • Comparing the US and Mexico justice systems.
  • What were the main causes of the Mexican Peso crisis of the 1990s?
  • Latin America telenovelas.
  • Comparing conservatives and liberals after revolutionary Latin America.
  • A closer look at the Cuban embargo.
  • What factors led to the Mexican revolution.

Latin American Research Topics: Puerto Rico

  • The importance of Puerto Rico during the 18 th -century slave labor and trade.
  • Analyzing the controversy of Puerto Rico’s statehood.
  • Analyzing the industrialization of Puerto Rico.
  • Comparing the Puerto Rican and Brazilian cultures.

Controversial Topics in Latin America

  • The growing Chinese influence in Latin America.
  • Analyzing the discovery of America via Latin America.
  • The struggle for national identity in South America.
  • History of Latin America: Taking a closer look at the rights of Portugal over Latin America.
  • Mexican Peso crisis of the 1990s: Was Bill Clinton’s decision for bailout justified?
  • Analyzing the US-Cuban relationship during the Cold War.
  • Guatemala history: Evaluating the fall of President Arbenz and the possible involvement of the US government.
  • Drug trade in South America: What are the historical roots?

south america essay topics

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  • South America Essays

South America Essays (Examples)

1000+ documents containing “south america” .

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Business in south america business.

This situation influenced populists in Venezuela, Bolivia, and Ecuador, which diminished their power in the region. Chavez' constitutional reform proposition was rejected by referendum, showing that the citizens of Venezuela desire a market-based democracy. In such conditions, it is only a matter of time until this democracy will be installed in the region. The GDP in South America is expected to continue its ascending direction, reaching a 4.3% growth rate this year (Latin Business Chronicle, 2008). Inflation is expected to remain relatively constant in the next period of time. In certain regions in South America inflation is expected to decrease. Given the conditions mentioned above, it is clear that South America will develop into investors' favorite destinations. The most important advantages of the region consist in: political stability in most regions, economic stability, government policies, and economic growth. However, investors should think very carefully how much they are willing to invest in….

Reference List

Chile - a Liberal Market in Latin America (2008). Hong Kong Trade Development Council. Retrieved October 10, 2008 at http://emerging.hktdc.com/content.aspx?data=EmergingMkt_content_en&contentid=1033126&src=BNT_CentralSouthAme&w_sid=194&w_pid=1401&w_nid=13506&w_cid=1033126&w_idt=1900-01-01&w_oid=181&w_jid=.

Latin America 2008: Political Outlook (2008). Latin Business Chronicle. Retrieved October 10, 2008 at http://www.latinbusinesschronicle.com/app/article.aspx?id=1956.

Latin America 2008: Macro Outlook (2008). Latin Business Chronicle. Retrieved October 10, 2008 at http://www.latinbusinesschronicle.com/app/article.aspx?id=1961.

Kozloff Nikolas Revolution South America

And there is also a clear, seductive appeal of U.S. culture which Kozloff also does not deny. As much as Chavez and company may opposed globalization, there is no escaping the new global economy. Kozloff's book is written from an unapologetically leftist stance. He is a frequent contributor to The Huffington Post, and Revolution! was mainly reviewed by leftist magazines and bloggers. However, it offers an important counterweight to the commonly-expressed idea that socialism is dead. The book is grounded in specificity and historically contextualizes each individual leftist movement. Despite the fact that it focuses on Venezuela, it does not make sweeping generalizations about the region based upon this specific example. Kozloff is careful to point out the unique features of Venezuela, such as the nation's vast oil wealth. Another of the book's strengths is the fact that it presents history from a Latin American perspective, rather than a U.S. perspective.….

Works Cited

Jacobs, Ron. "The new Left in Latin America." Counterpunch. April 12, 2008.

 http://www.counterpunch.org/2008/04/12/the-new-new-left-in-latin-america  / [September 7, 2011]

Kozloff, Nikolas. Revolution! South America and the Rise of the New Left. Palgrave-Macmillan,

Geography of South America Geography

This is above the historical average of 2.5% a year. What this shows is that because the different governments are encouraging the development of the region; many countries are being to see increased economic growth. As the continued investments in these areas, have allowed for the opportunity to increase imports to a number of markets around the world including: China and the United States. ("Latin America at Risk") However, the short to medium term gains that are experienced because of an increase in economic prosperity have helped to fuel the changes that are taking place to a number of geographic features located on the continent. This is because there is a balance between these geographic features and the temperature of the Earth. If human activity becomes so extreme in the area of these geographic features, then it could cause many to disappear or change form. This can have ripple effects….

Bibliography

"Globalization." Invest Words. 2010. Web 12 May 2010

"The Impact of Global Warming in South America." Climate Hot Map. 1999. Web. 12 May 2010.

"Latin America at Risk." World Economic Forum. 2010. Web. 12 May 2010.

"What Does Geography Mean." About. 2010. Web. 12 May 2010.

Art in South America and

This work of art depicts a struggle between two ancestors, the Bungalung man and a Tingari man, the latter of whom was trespassing on sacred land (No author). The copious quantity of dots, particularly the white ones, evinces the full force of the elements invoked by the Bungalung Man to beat his opponent into submission. The power of the Bungalung man is evinced by the fact that he leaves tracks in his wake when walks, which record permanent imprints on the earth. The setting in which this painting takes place, Tjikarri, is a common location in the artist's paintings. Aboriginal art reflects the sacred elements of the stories of creation for these people. It incorporates a variety of symbolism that is representative of dreaming, which is a means of ascertaining power and hearkens back to dreamtime, in which Aboriginals believe the world and all of its creations were made. Many….

Bardon, Geoffrey. "Aboriginal Art and Use of Symbols." Aboriginal Art Online. 2004.  http://www.aboriginalartonline.com/culture/symbols.php 

Nakamura, Janet. "Milky Way." Aboriginal Dreamtime. No date. Web.  http://www.jintaart.com.au/iconography/milkyway.htm 

Nakamura, Janet. "Stars." Aboriginal Dreamtime. No date. Web.  http://www.jintaart.com.au/iconography/starsico.htm 

No author. "About the Artist." Original and Authentic Aboriginal Art. 2004. Web.  http://www.authaboriginalart.com.au/Artist.asp?Artist=Johnny%20Warangkula%20Tjupurrula

Food History in South America

Food History In South America Cuisine This paper examines the cuisine of South America from the perspective of different elements that make the food unique to the region. This paper asks that one examine and investigate the cuisine history taking into consideration the following elements and distinctions: (1) The influence of geographical location on the cuisine, (2) Historically the groups or nations that have impact upon South American cuisine, (3) Practical and social rituals associated with the cuisine and (4) characteristic and unique ingredients, styles of seasoning, preparation processes and cooking procedures found in South American cooking. Upon investigation of these elements one hopes to gain a better appreciation of the cuisine and what attributes make it unique to the region, contributing to cultural identity. Geographical Location and Influence on South American Cuisine Geographical location plays a huge role in influencing the culture and cuisine for an area. Different areas have different ingredients….

Cuisine of Argentina and Chile. 31 Oct. 2005

Treating Chagas Disease in the Southern Cone of South America

Chagas Disease in the Southern Cone of South America Goal (What is the Purpose of the Intervention) The overarching goal of the initiative outlined by the Center for Global Development was the elimination of the insect vector in infested homes in the Southern cone of South America in order to reduce the incidence of Chagas disease. The issue of interest in this study was the epidemic of Chagas disease in the seven countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay and Peru) that comprise the southern cone of South America during the last decade of the 20th century. Facts: Facts esearched or Known Before Intervention Epidemiological and biological (disease burden, biological characteristics of disease. If a risk factor is involved, what is the connection of the risk factor to the burden of disease) esearchers determined early on that people who lived in impoverished rural areas were at greatest risk of acquiring Chagas disease. The impact of Chagas disease….

Case 12: Controlling Chagas disease in the Southern cone of South America. (n.d.). Center for Global Development. Retrieved from  http://www.cgdev.org/doc/millions/MS_  case_12.pdf.

South America Pre Hispanic Design and Art

Pre-Hispanic art works are seldom recognized as works of art; instead, they are often grouped as archeological remnants. This explains why you find most pre-Hispanic art pieces in historic and anthropology museums, instead of them being displayed on the walls of great Mexican art galleries like they do other masterpieces from great artists like Diego ivera and ufino Tamayo. In fact, these two great artists of all times got inspired by pre-Hispanic art. Tamayo (1899-1991), a Zapotec from Oaxaca, was very particular about preserving his collections as art collections and not science pieces (Barto, 2006). This explains why all his collections were donated to the National Institute of Fine Art and not the National Institute of Anthropology when he died. The ufino Tamayo museum was the result of this gesture, the only location in Mexico where pre-Hispanic collections are put on display like normal art pieces for the benefit of….

Barto, Anna. "Prehispanic Art." Another Day in Paradise 2006 ADIP Web. .

Cartwright, Mark. "Olmec Civilization - Ancient History Encyclopedia." Ancient History Encyclopedia. 30 Aug 2013. Web. 9 Dec 2015. .

Griffon, Simon. "The Difference Between The Aztec, Maya, Inca, And Olmec - KnowledgeNuts." KnowledgeNuts. 22 Oct 2013. Web. 10 Dec 2015. .

"Maya Art History." Maya Inca Aztec. Web. 10 Dec 2015. .

Mexican and South American Peruvian

For example, according to Miller (2009) [secondary]"Today, people don wooden skull masks called calacas and dance in honor of their deceased relatives. The wooden skulls are also placed on altars that are dedicated to the dead. Sugar skulls, made with the names of the dead person on the forehead, are eaten by a relative or friend." Other important customs and traditions in Mexico are related to family. The Mexican people traditionally have very close family relationships. Although the families are traditionally patriarchal in nature, this tradition is beginning to evolve much as it has in the United States towards a more equal relationship between the husband and wife. Divorce carries with it a great stigma in Mexican culture; so much so that in the 1990s the divorce rate was only 6.5% ("Countries and their Cultures," 2011). [secondary] Peru Like Mexico, Peru has a host of rich and colorful cultural traditions and customs.….

Countries and their Cultures: Mexico (2011) EveryCulture.com, Retrieved from  http://www.everyculture.com/Ma-Ni/Mexico.html  [secondary]

Countries and their Cultures: Peru (2011) EveryCulture.com, Retrieved from  http://www.everyculture.com/No-Sa/Peru.html  [secondary]

Herz, M. (2010) Cinco de Mayo. Inside Mexico. Retrieved from  http://www.inside-mexico.com/featurecinco.htm  [secondary]

Mexico (2011). CIA World Factbook. Retrieved from  

South America and History

Map of New orld They say that the winners of wars write history books. hen it comes to maps of the world prior to the full discovery and conquering of the world, it could be said that the desired winner of the war and/or conquest of the world write the maps. Indeed, the maps of that day are somewhat, if not wildly, inaccurate. They indeed reflect the desires and presumptions that the mapmakers of those days made. hile there were clear and obvious inaccuracies, the mistakes and projections made are very telling and can teach a number of lessons about that day and the people that existed within the same. In looking at the requested source material as well as a few other sources, it becomes clear that some assumptions were made that were clearly wrong and/or they were extremely well-assuming. Indeed, the travel of Columbus proves that. here he was planning….

History. "Amerigo Vespucci - Exploration - HISTORY.Com." HISTORY.com. N.p., 2016. Web. 3 Sept. 2016.

Smithsonian. "Columbus' Confusion About The New World." Smithsonian. N.p., 2016. Web. 3 Sept. 2016.

Today I Found It. "People In Columbus' Time Did Not Think The World Was Flat." Today I Found Out. N.p., 2013. Web. 3 Sept. 2016.

America Grade Level Social Studies This Activity

America Grade Level: Social Studies This activity is intended to focus on developing critical thinking, research, reading and writing skills in Students by making students motivated about learning necessary facts about United States, its demographics, history and distinctive attributes of U.S. Education Standards Addressed This particular lesson plan adheres to the Education Standard of United States (Teaching standards of the respective states) Enable students to develop report writing skills by following a given template. Enable students to develop and demonstrate their understanding regir undertsanding e elop report writing skills by fts about United States, its demographics arding overall geography of the states, its history, important places of tourists interests, structure of the government, general economy, and demography Enable the students to understand the report making process and develop reports using electronic tools such word processor and other softwares. The activity will also focus on developing graphs and necessary tables as well. report esources Needed: 1) Pencil 2) Notebook 3) Computer 4) BOOKS: Suid,….

Props will be required for role playing. Available at the School.

1) Comprehension of seceding states and the possible reasons behind these actions. Seceding states will be removed progressively from the board.

2) Students will be divided into two groups representing Union and Confederacy. They will select their leaders, design and make their own flags, slogans, other recruitment posters.

South African Perspective on AFRICOM

South African Perspective on United States Africa Command As the United States continues its drawdown of troops in the Middle East and reevaluates its prosecution of the global war on terrorism following the recent elimination of key Al-Qaeda leaders, most especially Osama bin Laden, it is important to assess the impact of these events on American military forces elsewhere, especially in sub-Saharan Africa in general and South Africa in particular. The so-called BIC (Brazil, ussia, India and China), with China taking the lead, are taking an increasingly active interest in developing improved trade and political ties with sub-Saharan African nations, and misperceptions of American global hegemonic intentions may interfere with the legitimate goals of the U.S. military in establishing improved relations with these countries. To help identify key challenges and potential solutions, this paper reviews the relevant literature to describe current U.S. military strategy in South Africa to provide salient policy….

"AFRICOM." (2011). (2011). GlobalSecurity.org. [online] available: http://www.globalsecurity.

org/military/agency/dod/africom.htm.

Gilbert, L. D,. Uzodike, U.O. & Isike, C. (2009). "The United States Africa Command: Security

for Whom?" The Journal of Pan African Studies 2(9): 264-266.

South This Report Is About

Some of the biggest incentives for manufactures are the outrageously low tax bases in southern states. "When taxes are paid, southern levies are lower than most Northern states. GM's Hamtramck, MIG, plant, for instance, has one of the highest property tax mileages in the United States at 88 mills." (Corbett, 2002) Taxes are some much lower than in say Michigan or New Jersey and southern state officials are very open to negotiations to land the new factories and the plethora of jobs. In other words, land values are low and government incentives are extraordinary so the automobiles industry would be crazy to not migrate south for those reasons alone. "Furthermore, utilities costs are lower. After the products have been assembled, the South's location is superior to the Midwest or the East Coast for delivery." (Corbett, 2002) but there are other incentives. Not only is the land for the new facilities cheaper….

Corbett, Brian (2002). Southern hospitality. Ward's Auto World, August.

America at War 1865-Present a Survey of

America at War 1865-Present A Survey of America at War from 1865 to Present Since the Civil War, America has seldom seen a generation of peace. In fact, a nonstop succession of wars has kept what Eisenhower termed "the military industrial complex" in lucrative business. From the Indian Wars to the World Wars to the Cold War to the war on Terror, Americana has expanded its foothold as an imperial power every step of the way -- even when isolationism appeared to be momentarily in vogue following World War I. This paper will look at the history of the progression of war in America from 1865 to present, showing how that history -- through social, economic, literary, political, and religious changes -- has both shaped and been shaped by American foreign and domestic policy. Unit Once: 1865-1876 The Civil War had just ended on the home front, but that did not mean that America….

Boyd, J.P. (2000). Indian Wars. Scituate, MA: Digital Scanning, Inc.

Jarecki, E. (2008). The American Way of War. NY: Free Press.

Jones, E.M. (2000). Libido Dominandi. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press.

Morehouse, M. (2007). Fighting in the Jim Crow Army: Black Men and Women

America's Diet

America's Diet The typical American diet is one high in sugars and processed foods. Accordingly, The United States has earned the unfortunate nickname of "Fast-food Nation." The initiation of the rapid growth in fast-food consumption rates in America is likely a result of this country's lack of a widely embraced and highly diverse national cuisine. The United States as a country is truly a melting pot for cultures, religions, ethnicities and beliefs. This vast assortment has certainly carried over into the world of food. That is, most Americans have easy access to a large array of different cuisines on a daily basis and this chronic presence of other cultural food choices has virtually destroyed any possibility of creating a truly American cuisine. Therefore, American citizens along with the rest of the world have transfixed fast-food into this national category. Without question, on the global stage, McDonald's and urger King are the….

Allison, C. (2010, May). Barbecue Master. Retrieved October 18, 2011, from  http://barbequemaster.blogspot.com/2010/05/chopped-pork-bbq-sandwich-with-sam-dog.html 

Baker, E.A., Schootman, M., Barnidge, E., & Kelly, C. (2006, July). The Role of Race and Poverty in Access to Foods That Enable Individuals to Adhere to Dietary Guidelines. Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research Practice and Policy, 3 (3).

Bedell, J. (2008). Food, Fitness, Obesity and Diabetes in the Bronx. Retrieved October 17, 2011, from New York City Department of Health: www.phanyc.org/files/food-fitness-obesity-in-bronx-bedell.ppt

Block, J.P., Scribner, R.A., & DeSalvo, K.B. (2004). Fast Food Race/Ethnicity, and Income: A Geographic Analysis. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 27 (3).

South Australia Ambulance Service Organizational Behaviour Case

South Australia Ambulance Service Organizational Behaviour Case Analysis Who ay Main should develop a system which empowers the culture of organization along with the shift towards automation and excellent customer service. Has to do what The leadership of South Australia Ambulance Service is required to do the following: To set a strategic direction for SAAS this would be compatible to the new strategic plan. Meet the service expectations of the clients by focusing more on efficient customer services. Empower the service delivery personnel fully and hold them accountable for every action. The expectations of donators and community should be aligned. Make SAAS compatible to respond to mass casualties. Workforce retention should be increased. Emergency sector and healthcare should be integrated to respond efficiently to any casualty. Interventions should be prioritized. The impact of any change should be evaluated on the patient as patients' life is more important. (Daniels 2009) The South Australia Ambulance Service (SAAS) should focus on developing a system which supports the leadership….

Steven McShane, Sandra Steen, (2008). Canadian Organizational Behaviour, Seventh Edition. McGraw-Hill Ryerson Higher Education; Canadian edition

Abernathy, W.B. (2006). Designing and managing an organization-wide incentive pay system. Memphis, TN: Abernathy & Associates.

Abernathy, W.B. (2006). The sin of wages: Where the conventional pay system has led us and how to find a way out. Memphis, TN: PerfSys Press.

Alvero, A.M., Bucklin, B.R., and Austin, J. An objective review of the effectiveness and essential characteristics of performance feedback in organizational settings. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management vol. 21 (2001). pp. 3 -- 29

Need Title for the causes and effect essay about deforestation.

Deforestation is a major issue with a global impact, but calls to end deforestation are going to remain unsuccessful unless people really understand the causes and effects of the process.  The economic depression in areas that are vulnerable to deforestation may leave them with few alternatives, and the ecological devastation that results from deforestation only perpetuates the economic vulnerability.  Here are some of our suggested titles for an essay about the causes and effects of deforestation:

Deforestation Essay Titles

  • Worlds that Will Never Be Known: The Impossibility of Predicting the True Effect of Deforestation

Is there anything in the news related to drug trafficking in italu that would make a good essay subject?

One recent news story related to drug trafficking in Italy is the arrest of Italian mafia boss Raffaele Imperiale in Dubai in November 2021. Imperiale has been on the run since 2016, when he was convicted in Italy for drug trafficking and sentenced to 30 years in prison. His arrest highlights the global reach of Italian organized crime groups and the challenges law enforcement agencies face in tracking down and apprehending these powerful criminals. Another potential essay topic related to drug trafficking in Italy is the increasing use of cryptocurrency by drug traffickers to facilitate their illicit activities. In recent years,....

how wealthy is brazil

Brazil's Economic Wealth Brazil, the largest country in South America, boasts a diverse economy with significant wealth and natural resources. However, despite its economic prominence, Brazil faces substantial challenges related to inequality, poverty, and socioeconomic disparities. GDP and Economic Indicators Brazil's gross domestic product (GDP) is the ninth largest in the world, reaching over USD 1.6 trillion in 2022. This represents a significant contribution to the global economy. Brazil's GDP per capita is around USD 7,600, placing it in the upper-middle-income category. The country's economic growth has been driven by several factors, including its abundance of natural resources, such as oil, minerals, and agricultural....

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Research Proposal

Literature - Latin-American

This situation influenced populists in Venezuela, Bolivia, and Ecuador, which diminished their power in the region. Chavez' constitutional reform proposition was rejected by referendum, showing that the citizens…

Book Report

And there is also a clear, seductive appeal of U.S. culture which Kozloff also does not deny. As much as Chavez and company may opposed globalization, there is…

This is above the historical average of 2.5% a year. What this shows is that because the different governments are encouraging the development of the region; many countries…

Art  (general)

This work of art depicts a struggle between two ancestors, the Bungalung man and a Tingari man, the latter of whom was trespassing on sacred land (No author).…

Agriculture

Food History In South America Cuisine This paper examines the cuisine of South America from the perspective of different elements that make the food unique to the region. This paper…

Drama - World

Chagas Disease in the Southern Cone of South America Goal (What is the Purpose of the Intervention) The overarching goal of the initiative outlined by the Center for Global Development was…

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Pre-Hispanic art works are seldom recognized as works of art; instead, they are often grouped as archeological remnants. This explains why you find most pre-Hispanic art pieces in historic…

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Some of the biggest incentives for manufactures are the outrageously low tax bases in southern states. "When taxes are paid, southern levies are lower than most Northern states. GM's…

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South Australia Ambulance Service Organizational Behaviour Case Analysis Who ay Main should develop a system which empowers the culture of organization along with the shift towards automation and excellent customer service. Has to…

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Essay on South America

Students are often asked to write an essay on South America in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on South America

South america: a land of diversity.

South America, the fourth-largest continent in the world, is a region of breathtaking natural beauty and diverse cultures. From the towering Andes Mountains to the lush Amazon rainforest, South America is home to some of the most iconic landscapes on Earth.

South America is located in the Southern Hemisphere and is bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the east. The continent is home to a wide range of climates, from the tropical rainforests of the Amazon Basin to the cold, dry deserts of Patagonia.

People and Culture

South America is a melting pot of cultures, with a rich history of indigenous, European, and African influences. The continent is home to a variety of ethnic groups, each with its own unique traditions and customs.

The economies of South America are diverse, ranging from the highly developed economies of Brazil and Argentina to the less developed economies of Bolivia and Paraguay. The continent is rich in natural resources, including oil, gas, and minerals.

South America is a continent of contrasts, with a rich history, diverse cultures, and stunning landscapes. It is a region that is sure to captivate and inspire visitors from all over the world.

250 Words Essay on South America

South america: a diverse continent.

South America, a continent brimming with captivating colors, rich history, and diverse cultures, is nestled between the mighty Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It’s a place where towering mountains meet lush green valleys, where energetic cities buzz with life, and where the Amazon rainforest hides some of the world’s most incredible creatures.

Natural Wonders

From the majestic peaks of the Andes to the breathtaking Iguazu Falls, South America is home to natural wonders that leave visitors in awe. The Amazon rainforest, the largest rainforest on Earth, is home to an astounding array of plant and animal life. The Andes Mountains stretch along the western coast, creating a formidable wall of peaks and valleys that offer spectacular scenery.

Cultural Heritage

South America’s cultural heritage is as diverse as its landscapes. Indigenous communities, with their rich traditions and beliefs, have called this continent home for centuries. The influence of European colonizers, especially the Spanish and Portuguese, can be seen in the region’s languages, architecture, and customs. African influences are also evident in the vibrant rhythms and dances found throughout the continent.

Bustling Cities

South America is home to some of the world’s most vibrant cities. Rio de Janeiro, with its iconic Christ the Redeemer statue and lively beaches, is a feast for the senses. São Paulo, Brazil’s economic powerhouse, is a bustling metropolis with a rich cultural scene. Buenos Aires, the capital of Argentina, is known for its tango dancing and European-influenced architecture.

Rich History

South America’s history is a captivating tale of ancient civilizations, colonial rule, and struggles for independence. The Inca Empire, once the largest empire in pre-Columbian America, left behind impressive ruins like Machu Picchu. The Spanish and Portuguese empires ruled over vast areas of South America for centuries, leaving a lasting impact on the region’s culture and society. Independence movements in the 19th century led to the formation of the modern nations we know today.

South America’s diversity, natural beauty, and cultural heritage make it a truly special place. From the towering Andes to the lush Amazon rainforest, from vibrant cities to ancient ruins, this continent offers something for every traveler to explore and enjoy.

500 Words Essay on South America

South america: a vibrant continent.

South America, situated in the Southern Hemisphere, is an awe-inspiring continent teeming with rich history, diverse cultures, and captivating natural wonders. From the towering Andes Mountains to the lush Amazon rainforest, this region exudes a charm that allures travelers worldwide. Let’s explore some of the fascinating aspects that make South America truly extraordinary.

South America is the fourth largest continent in the world, stretching from the Caribbean Sea in the north to the Southern Ocean in the south. The Andes, the longest continental mountain range, forms a formidable spine along the western coast, while the mighty Amazon River, the largest river by volume, snakes its way through the heart of the continent. South America is home to various landscapes, including snow-capped peaks, dense jungles, expansive savannas, and sparkling coastlines.

The history of South America is a captivating tapestry of ancient civilizations, colonial rule, and modern nation-building. In the pre-Columbian era, sophisticated civilizations like the Incas, Mayans, and Aztecs flourished in the region. Their architectural marvels, artistic achievements, and advanced systems of agriculture and astronomy continue to fascinate historians and archaeologists worldwide. European colonization brought significant changes, shaping the cultural and political landscape of the continent. Today, South America is a vibrant blend of indigenous, European, and African influences, reflected in its languages, traditions, and arts.

South America is a cultural melting pot, boasting a rich tapestry of traditions and expressions. Music, dance, and art thrive throughout the continent, with diverse genres like samba, tango, and Andean folk music captivating audiences globally. South America is also renowned for its literary giants, such as Gabriel García Márquez, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Isabel Allende, whose works have garnered international acclaim. Furthermore, the continent’s vibrant festivals and celebrations, like Carnival in Rio de Janeiro and Inti Raymi in Peru, showcase its cultural heritage and provide glimpses into the lives of its people.

Nature and Wildlife

South America is a haven for nature enthusiasts and wildlife lovers. The Amazon rainforest, the largest rainforest globally, is home to an astonishing diversity of plant and animal species. Explore its lush depths, and you’ll encounter jaguars, sloths, anacondas, and a myriad of colorful birds. The Andes Mountains offer breathtaking landscapes and diverse ecosystems, providing habitats for llamas, alpacas, and condors. The continent is also home to iconic landmarks like Angel Falls in Venezuela, the world’s highest uninterrupted waterfall, and the Atacama Desert in Chile, one of the driest places on Earth.

People and Society

South America is a vibrant tapestry of diverse ethnicities, languages, and cultures. Its people are known for their warm hospitality, lively spirit, and passion for life. They have overcome numerous challenges, including poverty, inequality, and political instability, with resilience and determination. Today, South America is witnessing economic growth and social progress, providing opportunities for its citizens to thrive.

South America stands as a testament to the beauty and diversity of our world. Its captivating history, vibrant culture, stunning natural wonders, and resilient people make it a destination that continues to inspire and fascinate travelers from across the globe.

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South American History - Stories

South America is a large continent with a rich history including fascinating people and places like the Inca, Machu Picchu, Che Guevara, Augusto Pinochet, Easter Island and more.

Polynesian canoes, circa 1768.

Did Polynesian Voyagers Reach the Americas Before Columbus?

The Polynesians were expert sailors—and research suggests they landed in the Americas centuries before Columbus.

How Inca Mummies Ruled in the Afterlife

How Inca Mummies Ruled Over the Living

The most important members of Inca society continued to be treated as living beings after death—and provided a powerful link to the gods.

Che Guevara billboard

The Epic Motorcycle Trip That Turned Che Guevara Into a Revolutionary

A coming-of-age adventure through five South American countries set Che Guevara on the path to becoming a Marxist revolutionary.

Augusto Pinochet

How a Dictator Got Away With a Brazen Murder in D.C. in 1976

General Pinochet’s agents hunted down Chile’s former Ambassador in the first state-sponsored international terrorist attack on U.S. soil.

Alexander Hamilton, by John Trumbull

7 Historical Figures Who Grew Up as Orphans

From a founding father to a Hollywood sex symbol, here are seven historical figures who succeeded without parents.

south america essay topics

Researchers May Be Closer to Solving Ancient Inca Mystery

Archaeologists hope a recently discovered stash of khipu, a system of strings and knots used by the ancient Inca civilization, will help them decode this mysterious mode of information storage.

Smithsonian researchers document one of the fossil whales from the Cerro Ballena site.

Scientists Probe Mystery Behind Chile’s Ancient Whale Graveyard

A new report provides insight into the amazing graveyard of fossilized whale skeletons unearthed during the construction of a Chilean highway.

An ancient corncob recently discovered in Peru.

Popcorn Was Popular in Ancient Peru, Discovery Suggests

Nearly seven millennia before movie nights and microwaves, humans snacked on popcorn, according to a new study.

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Essays on South America

32 samples on this topic

On this website, we've put together a catalog of free paper samples regarding South America. The idea is to provide you with a sample identical to your South America essay topic so that you could have a closer look at it in order to grasp a clear idea of what a top-notch academic work should look like. You are also urged to use the best South America writing practices displayed by competent authors and, eventually, create a top-notch paper of your own.

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Free A Comprehensive Review Of The Zika Virus Research Paper Sample

Chikungunya term paper sample.

Analysis of Diseases

Overview Chikungunya (CHIK) refers to a re-emerging arboviral disease transmitted by the mosquitos Aedes aegypty and Aedes albopictus (Pialoux 318). The virus belongs to the genus Alphavirus and family Togaviridae. The word chikungunya derives from Makonde language (spoken in Tanzania and northern Mozambique), where it means “to walk bent over” (Halstead 557). This name refers to the main feature of both chronic and acute phase of the disease a change in posture causes by the arthritis and arthralgia (Charrel, Lamballerie and Raoult 769).

Cross Cultural Comparison Of The Relations Between Cuba And The United States Research Papers Examples

The history of the relationship between Cuba and the United States was rich and strong until 1959 when Fidel Castro took over power and created a Communist government on the island. Due to this, relations between the United States and Cuba was strained and it has been uneasy since the 1960s. The purpose of this paper is to critically analyze and review the relations between Cuba and the United States and the cultural features and elements of the two nations in this process of transition.

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Consumption of coffee in the America. What role does Starbucks play in the American coffee culture? Thesis Statement The evolution of the American coffee culture traces its origins from the seventeenth century. Over the years, the country would grow to become the largest consumer of coffee in the world. It is corporations such as Starbucks have served to spread this culture across the globe.

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South to America

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59 pages • 1 hour read

South to America: A Journey Below the Mason Dixon to Understand the Soul of a Nation

A modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, SuperSummary offers high-quality Study Guides with detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, and more.

Chapter Summaries & Analyses

Part 1, Chapters 1-3

Part 1, Chapters 4-5

Part 2, Chapters 6-8

Part 2, Chapters 9-12

Part 3, Chapters 13-15

Part 3, Chapters 16-18

Key Figures

Index of Terms

Important Quotes

Essay Topics

What is Perry’s purpose in writing South to America ? How does she perceive the South as a Black woman of Southern heritage who lives in the North?

What argument is Perry making about the South , and how does she support it? How does she define the South, and what areas comprise it?

At the end of Chapter 11, Perry writes that we “know the song, maybe even the story [of the US’s history of repression], but I want you to study its provenance. Because it belongs to you, too. We are all implicated; we all are. But will you serve as witness” (212)? What is your answer to her question? How can contemporary Americans define and understand the South? How does the region shape US identity and your personal identity?

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South America Essays

Essay on poverty in south america.

only in South America but it is all around the world. You may not know but it could be happening in your own home town. Poverty is a big problem today due to many reasons but one being the distribution of wealth between social classes is unequal. Many people of South America are dealing with extreme poverty. There are many reasons behind the poverty in South America. The main reason is the distribution of wealth is very unequal (Bank). Some other reasons that poverty is such a thing in South America

Deforestation In South America Essay

years. In countries like South America, the people turn to agriculture to meet the needs of everyday life, which leads to deforestation. In poor communities in places like South America, farming is the way of life because this is how they survives and make money. By the removing of trees, it creates more space for farming grazing, and it’s a source of income for many people. The loss of land is also due to mining as well creating another source of income in South America. Although deforestation is

Similarities Between South America And Spain

meaning that it is surrounded by water on many of its sides. Bolivia is completely landlocked, although one side is somewhat close to the sea. Spain is near Europe, within distance of many different countries. Bolivia however is on the side of South America, closer to the equator than Spain. Because of these differences in location, there are many differences that arise between the countries themselves. These differences are what define the countries and make them unique. Yet while both of these countries

South America Thesis

Thesis Statement: The United States should colonize South America because it may increase their resources, increase economic growth, and unify groups to achieve a common goal. Body Paragraph #1 Topic Sentence: The United States should colonize South America because it could potentially increase the amount of resources South America gains. Supporting Evidence #1: According to Encyclopedia Entry on South America: Resources, South America has a large and profitable mining industry, more than one

Reasons To Colonize South America

should colonize South America. South America is known for its vast land, plentiful crops, and different types of climates. America should colonize South America because it is the fourth largest continent and is plentiful in mining, oil, and fish. Colonization is when a group of people relocate to a new area to help the native people become more developed. In the 1800 's Europe colonized Africa because of its vast land, good location, and plentiful resources. In the year 2030, America should colonize

Brazil: The Largest Economy In South America

Brazil is by far the largest economy in South America. It has a population of over 204 million people and a labor force of 110 million. Throughout the last couple decades, Brazil has focused on expanding its middle class, creating a larger skilled workforce and a larger consumer base; and although the country is one of the most resourceful in the world, corruption and bureaucracy are still intricately related with the country’s business environment. The country had a high growth rate during the

Overcoming Discrimination In South America

foreigners or blacks changed is continuously asked. With countless protests, reforms, speakers and even a war one would think yes considering there are no longer segregated areas or racial slurs yelled out. So, America has moved towards a more equal world, but what about countries such as South Africa that faced an even more difficult struggle overcoming discrimination? When reading the first chapter of Invictus, one particular quote made me think maybe so. The lines read, “ The curious thing was that

The Pros And Cons Of Colonization Of South America

America once colonized South America. Based on past examples Colonization of South America would be wrong because Americans would be taking away South America's freedom and increasing violence in their country Americans should not try to colonize South America because it would be taking away their freedom, like the British did to Africa. Notice what happened when the British tried to take over Africa, “Africans lost control of their land and of their independence”(Lugard, F. 1929). The British came

used their better resources to take advantage of the land and the natives. South America is struggling to establish growth in some of its countries, and have major problems in increasing development. Some people would want to colonize and make South America great again, but it would be against the best interest of the United States and South America to do so. Therefore, the United States should not colonize South America because of the loss of

Income Inequality In South America Essay

ownership, greater is the ability to amass riches. Unequal distribution of fortune also averts an inclusive growth pattern that Latin America is experiencing. Secondly, income inequality goes hand in hand with unequal access to good things such as education, health and political power—inequalities that violate basic principles of democracy. Third, inequality in Latin America involves widespread poverty: two out of five Latin Americans are poor, even though most of them live in “middle-income” countries

The Incca Empire In South America

The Incas ruled a fantastic Empire in South America, but not until the Spaniards invaded the Empire and destroyed it in no time. The expansion began in 1438 led by a ruler called Pachacuti and continued under his generations. In about 1300 the Incas founded their capital city, Cuzco. Inca was only an itsy-bitsy tribe, however, not until they covered most of Peru and parts of Chile, Ecuador, Bolivia and northwest Argentina. Since they lived in mountain ranges, they were able to attack the enemies

Deep Cultural Approach To Health Care In South Africa And America

In South Africa, the “deep culture” topic of the approach to healthcare is similar in South Africa than in America. For example, both countries operate under a Bio/Western Medicine Philosophy, both countries use their government in order to regulate healthcare, and for both countries, fighting disease is a major focus. In South Africa, HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria are all large problems that impact large numbers of the population. Upwards of 19% of the population is said to be infected by

How Did Simon Bolivar Changed South America

Simon Bolivar changed South America. He freed many countries in South America, while keeping his goals entirely intact. He took a stand against a tyrannical leader, to defeat a corrupt government, to gain freedom, and liberty. When Simon Bolivar was a young man he traveled to Europe, to visit the ruler of Spain, Napoleon. Napoleon was a French military leader who had crowned himself emperor, and quickly rose to power. While in Europe, Bolivar and Napoleon discussed their goals and ambitions. Napoleon

Why Is Simon Bolivar Called The George Washington Of South America

fought in the war to have independence in South America. Bushwell wanted to explain what actually happened with Simon Bolivar when he fought in the war to have independence in his country. The PDF reading of Simon Bolivar and Manuela, Leaders of South American Independence explains how Bolivar helped South America became independence country. For the Sounth America, they believe Simon Bolivar and he “has been called the ‘George Washington of South America’ for his efforts in securing the independence

South America North And South Essay

Infant Mortality Rate: The south has higher values than the north. The west has lower values than the west. The highest values are in central Africa, south and southeast Asia and western south america. The lowest values are in north America, Europe and northeast Asia. In Europe, the lower values are in the north and the east and the higher values are in the west. In Africa, the highest values are in the center and the lowest values are in the north and the south. In South America the the highest values

Essay On South America

Introduction South America is world’s fourth largest continent. It has an area of 17,840,000 km2 that covers one-eighth of the land area on Earth. South America is home to about 423 million people. There are 12 sovereign nations and other territories in the continent. South America contains natural wonders and unique cultures. It was once home to many ancient civilisations and tribes. Today, the population of South America is a mixture of Europeans, Africans and indigenous. Most of them reside near

Poverty In South America

Love it or hate it, the South is a place like no other. There are many great things about the south. Some of the best things about the south are the delicious southern home cooked meals, the southern hospitality, football, sweet tea, and being the birthplace of many successful musicians and writers. However, there are some things in the south that are not so great. Unfortunately, the south is also known for having some of the most obese residents, having a high percentage of teen pregnancies, and

The Economic Growth Of North And South America From 1800s To 1860

economic growth of North and South America from the 1800s to the 1860s differed in multiple ways. Various factors such as: culture, views toward slavery, population, agriculture, and industry greatly effected the separation of economic growth in America. As their conflicting opinions towards slavery grew stronger, the South continued to rely on agriculture; however, the North fulfilled their economic needs through industry. In spite of their differences, the North and South did have some similarities

Peanuts In South America

Peanuts History: Peanuts have existed in South America for thousands of years. It is very significant diet for the South America and Maxico. They are basically used in many African countries and converted into traditional foods. They were valued as a blessed food and moved to the North America, which is beginning firstly into this the region. Peanuts are considered as a popular gain in popularity in the U.S b y the struggle of the particular persons like George Washington and the St. Missouri.

South American Myths And Legends Of South American Mythology

South American myths and legends are very much known by the South American community. South american mythology is known for its mythical legends, and the outlandish mythical stories because South american mythology has a collection of mythical stories that tell why, what,and how something is or what it does and south american mythology has many mythical legends that are well known, and important to south american mythology. South american mythology has a collection of mythical stories that tell

Latin American Studies

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My Guyanese Culture

This essay about Guyanese culture explores the rich and diverse heritage of Guyana, a country uniquely positioned as the only English-speaking nation in South America and a cultural bridge between the Caribbean and the continent. It highlights the mix of ethnicities and traditions that shape its society, from Indigenous peoples to descendants of Africans, Indians, and other groups brought over during colonial times. Key aspects such as cuisine, which includes dishes like pepperpot and curry, festivals such as Mashramani, and the everyday use of a creole dialect illustrate the integration of various cultural influences. The essay also emphasizes the peaceful coexistence of different religions and the overall sense of community and mutual respect that pervades the country, underscoring the resilience and vibrancy of the Guyanese spirit.

How it works

Guyana, often depicted as the connector between the Caribbean and South America, unveils a diverse mosaic of cultures that is as intricate as it is captivating. Situated on the northern fringes of South America, bordered by Brazil, Venezuela, and Suriname, Guyana distinguishes itself as the sole English-speaking nation in South America. This unique geographic disposition has nurtured a fusion of cultures, ethnicities, and histories that materialize distinctively in its populace, gastronomy, festivities, and daily affairs.

The cultural multiplicity of Guyana finds its roots in its historical narrative of colonization and migration.

Initially inhabited by Indigenous peoples, such as the Arawak and Carib, the land was subsequently colonized by the Dutch and later by the British. These colonial dominions introduced Africans, Indians, and a minority of Portuguese and Chinese to toil on sugar estates. Each demographic brought forth its own customs, tongues, and faiths, contributing to the kaleidoscopic tapestry that characterizes contemporary Guyana.

The imprint of these varied demographics is most discernible in Guyanese cuisine, an exquisite culinary odyssey. Delicacies like pepperpot, a piquant stew crafted with cassareep (a condiment derived from cassava) and meat, resonate with the Indigenous lineage. Curry, roti, and dhal puri constitute dietary staples that echo the Indian influence. Meanwhile, the Afro-Guyanese populace has popularized dishes such as cook-up rice, a single-pot repast comprising rice, legumes, and occasionally protein, all simmered with coconut milk and an eclectic medley of spices. Gastronomy in Guyana epitomizes its historical narrative, a delectable amalgamation of its manifold cultures.

Festivals and melodies also assume a pivotal role in Guyanese ethos, serving as both a commemoration of ancestry and a medium for communal solidarity. Mashramani, an Amerindian term signifying “revelry post toil,” stands out as particularly vibrant. Observed annually on February 23rd to celebrate Guyana’s Republic Day, it encompasses processions, floats, melodies, and revelry that imbue the thoroughfares with vivacity and jubilation. Other noteworthy observances include Phagwah (Holi), the Hindu festival of hues, and Diwali, the festival of illumination. Irrespective of their origins, each festivity is embraced by all ethnic cohorts, underscoring the nation’s unity in diversity.

Religion in Guyana represents yet another facet of its heterogeneous culture. The populace predominantly adheres to Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam, and it is commonplace to encounter churches, mandirs, and mosques coexisting in close proximity, sometimes even adorning the same thoroughfare. This cohabitation serves as a testament to the Guyanese ethos of tolerance and inclusivity. Religious observances from each creed are accorded public holidays and are commemorated by the entire populace, irrespective of individual spiritual inclinations.

In day-to-day existence, the cultural amalgam is palpable in the prevalent utilization of a creole vernacular, an Anglophone dialect interwoven with idioms from African, Indo-Caribbean, and Indigenous tongues. This linguistic amalgamation mirrors the nation’s historical trajectory and demographic diversity, serving as a lingua franca among Guyanese of divergent pedigrees.

The ethos of Guyana is encapsulated not solely in its festivities or fare but in the quotidian interactions among its denizens. There exists a tangible sense of camaraderie and mutual deference that transcends ethnic demarcations. Despite the tribulations of economic and political vicissitudes, Guyanese culture remains resilient, vibrant, and all-encompassing.

Comprehending Guyanese culture provides a gateway into the intricate interweaving of diverse cultural constituents to fashion a distinctive and cohesive national ethos. It serves as a potent reminder of how history, migration, and the confluence of disparate ways of life can sculpt a community steeped in tradition yet dynamic in its evolution. This cultural opulence renders Guyana not merely a nation but a celebration of human diversity and solidarity.

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Queer Natives in the Andes Region of South America

Introduction.

It weaves a tapestry of resilience, affliction, and cultural richness in the Andes region. The following long-term study explores the various layers of history, culture, and life experience of this community that is so close to nature.

Probing into the root of these experiences is a noble effort in which we dare to make sense of madness and explore unfamiliar, forbidding roads. Navigating this treacherous terrain, the study aims to provide a better understanding of multiple and robust Queer Indigenous identities whose rich contributions are always part of South America’s historical tapestry.

Pre-Colonial History

Indigenous gender and sexuality constructs.

To truly grasp the current panorama of Queer Indigenous relations, we travel into pre-columbian times and find gender and sexuality concepts rooted in Andean culture. Within the overall framework, third-gender subjects become a central thread in Andean societies. To develop an understanding of these constructs, a careful investigation into the fluidity and openness that existed in indigenous conceptions of gender and sexuality is required.

Art, Rituals, and Cultural Practices

The further we journey back to pre-colonial history, the more detailed and beautiful embroidery of indigenous cultural practices and rites about queer identities within their societies is revealed in the landscape. Texts of history and anthropology provide us with invaluable resources to examine the manifestations of queer identity within indigenous art. Artifacts of ceramics and sculptures become windows onto a world where queerness was tolerated and often celebrated. This exploration aims to reveal the voices and lives that, up until now, have been forgotten by historical erasure.

This examination of pre-colonial practices is not limited to an archaeological gaze, seeking to reconstruct the vitality and variety among gender expressions and sexual identities inside indigenous communities. These cultural artifacts and practices represented personal identities and reflected a society comfortable with the full spectrum of human experience.

And in shining a light on these pre-colonial narratives, we can see that the history of Queer Indigenous People is not some newfangled phenomenon but rather one with roots going back through centuries to cultural praxis, which buck conventional heteronormative thinking about sex and gender. This exploration offers a foundation, encouraging us to reconceptualize the concept of Queer Indigenous experiences in terms that have deeper historical and cultural roots.

The pre-colonial past opens up a richer understanding of what the Queer Indigenous experience might have been like, in which there was broad acceptance of diversity and variability. The next stop is the colonial epoch, and the battle of cultures would, in many ways, define what Queer Indigenous life would look like within this historical millennial.

Colonial History

The colonial rule on queer indigenous communities.

With the arrival of Spanish colonizers, so began a horrendous chapter in Queer Indigenous People’s lives that ultimately tore apart their way of living, which had endured for centuries. The process of colonial rule was a history of disruption for these communities, with the legal world, along with society and culture itself, transformed.

Post-Colonial History

Contemporary readings and retrieval of identity.

Narratives of erasure and persecution In the current Andean environment, one sees new versions being fashioned to define Queer Indigenous identities. Scholarly works and cultural studies have become essential forums where the stories can be retold, with a silenced community finally given a voice.

These contemporary reinterpretations explore the multiple aspects of Queer Aboriginal identities. The scholarly debate exceeds its Eurocentric scope. It incorporates native views to redefine what it means for a person to be queer in the Andes Rich in indigenous experience, cultural studies explore expressions of queerness, including art forms and rituals extracted with social practices to balance the colonial legacy.

Reclaiming an identity is not a passive process. It’s one of creation and discovery. Queer Indigenous persons are currently busily using the thread to reconstruct this sub-narrative–sewing their stories into contemporary Andean culture. This part of the paper represents those hardships and the community’s pride in having moved past tradition and modernity.

On the one hand, there has been real progress achieved by Queer Indigenous People in post-colonial Andean societies. As legal reforms move forward, albeit haltingly, as societal attitudes change and indigenous voices are increasingly heard within society, the story of queer Aboriginal identities is gradually being rewritten. The South American Future In this era of post-colonialism, a history plagued by oppression will fade into the background. As Queer Indigenous People emerge from their shadows and reclaim space in each mosaic cell on display here at Londres 365, we’ll witness an ever-broadening horizon as they transform reality with every drop uniquely added to

 Laws and Violence

Detailed look at legal frameworks.

From establishment to elimination, The development of queer indigenous communities in the Andes has been entangled with legal frameworks they have embraced and with whom their lives were intertwined. Sexuality The Spanish imposed their rigid views on the natives, leaving an indelible mark that is a part of legal perspectives. Di Pietro’s works reveal the effect colonialism had on legal structures. There was a change from archaic “justice” taken over by Britain during its so-called viceroyalty, in stages through the 18th and particularly in most respects throughout much or all of the 19th century). While the changes in Andean legal thought were slow and imperceptible, occurring as they did between colonial governance and independence (Di Pietro)

Legal discrimination was by no means confined to the colonial era. Horswell uses colonial Andean culture as an example to illustrate that homosexuality was conceived of as a violation of nature, prompting vicious punishments such as crucifixion or being burned alive. The aftershocks of such legal persecution continued through the decades, embroiling queer indigenous peoples in a treacherous juridical landscape (Horswell).

Violence, Discrimination, and Resistance

And the pages of history are plastered with things like violence and discrimination, as well as resistance from resilient queer indigenous communities. The lynchings and systematic persecutions during the colonial period carried on into the post-colonial era, establishing a tradition of violence against people because of sexual orientation (Horswell). This violence frequently went beyond physical injury, including social outcasting, family exile, and economic exclusion.

This split between indigenous culture and social customs on the one hand and an ever more splintered expression of gender and sexuality on the other created a tense landscape where survival itself depended upon resistance. Marchán documents Gahela Cari in Peru, which highlights contemporary instances of resistance. Holders within the communities are trying to overturn power relations that never came into being and restore constitutional rights for people who lack sexual identity (Marchan).

Cultural Significance of Queer Identity

Meanings, cultures.

The concept of queer identity in Aboriginal communities goes far beyond Western understandings. Exploring these nuances means delving into the indigenous perspectives on gender and sexuality. This native sense of commonality with nature also includes the idea of assorted sexualities. Dual-gender jaguars (chuqui chinchay) once mediated between the feminine and masculinity. Di Pietro’s work stresses that duality is an element of continuity in Andean thought, connected right from the start with gender (Di Pietro). This fluidity in gender roles reflects a complex weave of deeper meanings that all help shape queer identity within indigenous cultures.

Analysis of Contemporary Expressions

Expressing contemporary queer indigenous identities takes a variety of forms, from flashy stage shows to sacred rites and the mundane scenes that make up daily life. The case of Q’iwa and popular celebrations in Bolivia will serve to explain how cultural events become arenas for the expression and celebration of queer identities, as examined by Villar-Pérez. Such expressions are in opposition to historical erasure and help position queer people within indigenous communities (Villar-Pérez).

Investigating Current Challenges

For all the progress made in recent decades, queer indigenous people are faced with multifaceted challenges. Visibility, social acceptance, and political representation are still crucial issues. Also, being marginalized within a larger society, they must grapple with reconciling traditional ideals and practices about the rapidly changing queer identity. Lelis points to the constitutional bans on same-gender couples in Paraguay and Bolivia as examples of how these communities still face complex legal challenges (Lelis).

Perspectives and Voices

Amid these challenges, queer indigenous voices and perspectives offer deep insights. For example, Marchán’s interviews with Gahela Cari tell the story of one such Andean gay or lesbian in a human way (Marchán). Though they are usually neglected in mainstream discussion, these stories help fill out the cultural meaning of queer identification.

Andean Quer Indigenous People’s history describes a fighter. The pre-colonial embrace of third-gender subjects became colonial repression and this shaped modern understandings. An analysis of legal reforms reveals post-colonial evolution. Law studies on the law and violence are especially instructive. The cultural significance extends beyond Western notions, with the contemporary expressions representing a counter-offensive against historical deletion. These ongoing battles reveal the importance of advocacy and respect for Andean cultural diversity.

Works Cited

Andía, María Gracia, et al.  Same-sex Marriage in Latin America: Promise and Resistance . Lexington Books, 2012.

Babb, Florence E. “Gender and Sexuality in the Andes.”  The Andean World . Routledge, 2018, pp. 403–417.

Campana, Maximiliano, and Juan Marco Vaggione. “ Courts and Same-Sex Marriage in Latin America .” Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. 2021.

Di Pietro, Pedro Jose Javier.  Thirding as a way of arranging the real: The production of decolonial queer spaces in the Southern Andes . State University of New York at Binghamton, 2012.

Encarnación, Omar Guillermo.  Out in the periphery: Latin America’s gay rights revolution . Oxford University Press, 2016.

Gontijo, Fabiano, Barbara Arisi, and Estêvão Fernandes.  Queer Natives in Latin America . Springer International Publishing, 2021.

Horswell, Michael J.  Decolonizing the sodomite: Queer tropes of sexuality in colonial Andean culture . University of Texas Press, 2006.

Lelis, Rafael Carrano. “In Search of Lost Latin-American Colours: An Analysis of the Constitutional Protection of LGBTI Rights in Latin America.”  Comparative Law Review  25.1 (2019): 9-57.

Marchán, Eloy. Gahela Cari: “ In Peru, People are Questioning the System .” NACLA, 2021.

McGuire, Michelle.  Rethinking Intimacy: Liberation Through Decolonial & Queer World-Making . Diss. Loyola University Chicago, 2021.

University of Michigan.  Global Feminisms Comparative Case Studies Of Women’s And Gender Activism And Scholarship . Regents of the University of Michigan, 2000.

Villar-Pérez, Raquel.  LGBTQ+ Liberation in the Andes through Q’iwa and Popular Celebrations . Bolivia, 2023.

Wilson-Sanchez, Maya. “Performing reparative history in the Andes: Travesti methods and Ch’ixi subjectivities.”  Journal of Visual Culture , vol. 21, no.1, 2022, pp. 206–232.

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Discrimination Experiences Shape Most Asian Americans’ Lives

Stereotypes of asians in the u.s. as foreigners and a model minority drive discrimination, table of contents.

  • Key findings from the survey
  • Most Asian Americans have been treated as foreigners in some way, no matter where they were born
  • Most Asian Americans have been subjected to ‘model minority’ stereotypes, but many haven’t heard of the term
  • Experiences with other daily and race-based discrimination incidents
  • In their own words: Key findings from qualitative research on Asian Americans and discrimination experiences
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  • Quality of service in restaurants and stores
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  • In their own words: How Asian Americans would react if their friend was told to ‘go back to their home country’
  • Awareness of the term ‘model minority’
  • Views of the term ‘model minority’
  • How knowledge of Asian American history impacts awareness and views of the ‘model minority’ label
  • Most Asian Americans have experienced ‘model minority’ stereotypes
  • In their own words: Asian Americans’ experiences with the ‘model minority’ stereotype
  • Asian adults who personally know an Asian person who has been threatened or attacked since COVID-19
  • In their own words: Asian Americans’ experiences with discrimination during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Experiences with talking about racial discrimination while growing up
  • Is enough attention being paid to anti-Asian racism in the U.S.?
  • Acknowledgments
  • Sample design
  • Data collection
  • Weighting and variance estimation
  • Methodology: 2021 focus groups of Asian Americans
  • Appendix: Supplemental tables

Pew Research Center conducted this analysis to understand Asian Americans’ experiences with discrimination in the United States and their views of anti-Asian racism in the country. This report is the latest in the Center’s in-depth analysis of public opinion among Asian Americans .

The data in this report comes from two main sources. The first is a nationally representative survey of 7,006 Asian adults exploring the experiences, attitudes and views of Asians living in the U.S. on several topics, including discrimination and racism in America, identity , affirmative action , global affairs , policy priorities and religious identities . The survey sampled U.S. adults who self-identify as Asian, either alone or in combination with other races or Hispanic ethnicity. It was offered in six languages: Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), English, Hindi, Korean, Tagalog and Vietnamese. Responses were collected from July 5, 2022, to Jan. 27, 2023, by Westat on behalf of Pew Research Center.

The Center recruited a large sample to examine the diversity of the U.S. Asian population, with oversamples of the Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Korean and Vietnamese populations. These are the five largest origin groups among Asian Americans. The survey also includes a large enough sample of self-identified Japanese adults, making findings about them reportable. In this report, the six largest ethnic groups include those who identify with one Asian ethnicity only, either alone or in combination with a non-Asian race or ethnicity. Together, these six groups constitute 81% of all U.S. Asian adults, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of the Census Bureau’s 2021 American Community Survey (ACS), and are the six groups whose attitudes and opinions are highlighted throughout the report.

Survey respondents were drawn from a national sample of residential mailing addresses, which included addresses from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Specialized surname list frames maintained by the Marketing Systems Group were used to supplement the sample. Those eligible to complete the survey were offered the opportunity to do so online or by mail with a paper questionnaire. For more details, refer to the survey methodology . For questions used in this analysis, refer to the topline questionnaire .

Findings for less populous Asian origin groups in the U.S., those who are not among the six largest Asian origin groups, are grouped under the category “other” and are included in the overall Asian adult findings in the report. These ethnic origin groups each make up about 2% or less of the Asian population in the U.S., making it challenging to recruit nationally representative samples for each origin group. The group “other” includes those who identify with one Asian ethnicity only, either alone or in combination with a non-Asian race or Hispanic ethnicity. Findings for those who identify with two or more Asian ethnicities are not presented by themselves in this report but are included in the overall Asian adult findings.

The second data source for this report is focus groups . Survey results are complemented by findings from 66 pre-survey focus groups of Asian adults , conducted from Aug. 4 to Oct. 14, 2021, with 264 recruited participants from 18 Asian origin groups. Focus group discussions were conducted in 18 different languages and moderated by members of their origin groups. In the focus groups, participants discussed their experiences with discrimination in the United States, and some quotations are used in this report. Quotations are not necessarily representative of the majority opinion in any particular group living in the U.S. or of Asian Americans overall. Quotations may have been edited for grammar, spelling and clarity.

Pew Research Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. The Center’s Asian American portfolio was funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts, with generous support from The Asian American Foundation; Chan Zuckerberg Initiative DAF, an advised fund of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation; the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; the Henry Luce Foundation; the Doris Duke Foundation; The Wallace H. Coulter Foundation; The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation; The Long Family Foundation; Lu-Hebert Fund; Gee Family Foundation; Joseph Cotchett; the Julian Abdey and Sabrina Moyle Charitable Fund; and Nanci Nishimura.

We would also like to thank the Leaders Forum for its thought leadership and valuable assistance in helping make this survey possible.

The strategic communications campaign used to promote the research was made possible with generous support from the Doris Duke Foundation.

The terms Asians, Asians living in the United States, U.S. Asian population and Asian Americans are used interchangeably throughout this report to refer to U.S. adults who self-identify as Asian, either alone or in combination with other races or Hispanic identity.

Ethnicity and ethnic origin labels, such as Chinese and Chinese origin, are used interchangeably in this report for findings for ethnic origin groups, such as Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Japanese, Korean or Vietnamese. For this report, ethnicity is not nationality. For example, Chinese in this report are those self-identifying as of Chinese ethnicity, rather than necessarily being a current or former citizen of the People’s Republic of China. Ethnic origin groups in this report include those who identify as one Asian ethnicity only, either alone or in combination with a non-Asian race or ethnicity. Responses for Asian adults who identify with two or more Asian ethnic origin groups are included in the total but not shown separately.

Less populous Asian origin groups in this report are those who self-identify with ethnic origin groups that are not among the six largest Asian ones. They are grouped under the category “other” when displayed in charts. The term includes those who identify with only one Asian ethnicity, either alone or in combination with a non-Asian race or ethnicity. These ethnic origin groups each represent about 2% or less of the overall Asian population in the U.S. For example, those who identify as Burmese, Hmong or Pakistani are included in this category. Survey findings from these groups are unreportable on their own due to small sample sizes, but collectively they are reportable under this category.

Region and regional origin labels, such as East Asian and East Asian origin, are used interchangeably in this report for findings for regional origin groups, such as East Asian (which includes Chinese, Japanese, Korean or other East Asian origins), South Asian (which includes Bangladeshi, Indian, Nepali, Pakistani or other South Asian origins) or Southeast Asian (which includes Cambodian, Filipino, Hmong, Vietnamese or other Southeast Asian origins) adults. Regional Asian origin groups in this report include those who self-identify with an Asian ethnic origin group or multiple Asian ethnic origin groups that belong to one Asian region only. Responses for Asian adults who identify with ethnic origin groups that belong to two or more Asian regions are included in the total but not shown separately.

Immigrants in this report are people who were born outside the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico or other U.S. territories. Immigrant, foreign born and born abroad are used interchangeably to refer to this group.  

Naturalized citizens are immigrants who are lawful permanent residents who have fulfilled the length of stay and other requirements to become U.S. citizens and who have taken the oath of citizenship.

U.S. born refers to people born in the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico or other U.S. territories.

Among immigrants, there are two distinct immigrant generation groups in this report:

  • First generation refers to people who were born outside the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico or other U.S. territories and immigrated to the U.S. when they were 18 or older . Throughout the report, the term first generation and the phrase immigrants who came to the U.S. as adults are used interchangeably.
  • 1.5 generation refers to people who were born outside the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico or other U.S. territories and immigrated to the U.S. when they were younger than 18 years old . Throughout the report, the term 1.5 generation and the phrase immigrants who came to the U.S. as children are used interchangeably.

Among U.S. born, there are two distinct immigrant generation groups in this report:

  • Second generation refers to people born in the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico or other U.S. territories with at least one foreign-born (immigrant) parent. Throughout the report, the term second generation and the phrase U.S.-born children of immigrant parents are used interchangeably.
  • Third or higher generation refers to people born in the 50 U.S. states or the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico or other U.S. territories with both parents born in the 50 states, D.C., Puerto Rico or other U.S. territories.

Primary language is a composite measure based on self-described assessments of speaking and reading abilities. People who are origin language dominant are more proficient in the Asian origin language of their family or ancestors than in English (i.e., they speak and read their Asian origin language “very well” or “pretty well” but rate their ability to speak and read English lower). Bilingual refers to those who are proficient in both English and their Asian origin language. People who are English dominant are more proficient in English than in their Asian origin language.

Throughout this report, Democrats refers to respondents who identify politically with the Democratic Party or those who are independent or identify with some other party but lean toward the Democratic Party. Similarly, Republicans includes both those who identify politically with the Republican Party and those who are independent or identify with some other party but lean toward the Republican Party.

In this report, Asian adults who are single race include those who self-identify as Asian and no other non-Asian race or origin. Asian adults who are two or more races include those who self-identify as Asian and at least one other non-Asian race or origin (such as White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, or some other non-Asian race or origin). Racial identity groups were constructed regardless of Hispanic self-identity.

The spike in incidents of anti-Asian discrimination during the COVID-19 pandemic sparked national conversations about race and racial discrimination concerning Asian Americans. 1 But discrimination against Asian Americans is not new. 2 From the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, to denial of the right to become naturalized U.S. citizens until the 1940s, to the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, to backlash against Muslims, Sikhs and South Asians after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, most Asian Americans have faced discrimination and exclusion while being treated as foreigners throughout their long history in the United States.

A bar chart showing that 57% of Asian adults say discrimination against Asians living in the U.S. is a major problem. Meanwhile, 63% say too little attention is paid to race and racial issues concerning Asians living in the U.S.

At the same time, Asian Americans have often been upheld as a model for how other racial and ethnic minorities should behave – especially in comparison with Black Americans and Latinos. 3 Despite the socioeconomic diversity among U.S. Asians, they are commonly portrayed as educationally and economically successful, hardworking, deferential to authority, unemotional and lacking in creativity. 4 This “model minority” stereotype has placed Asian Americans at the center of debates about meritocracy , selective admissions to elite institutions and affirmative action .

Today, 57% of Asian adults see discrimination against Asians living in the U.S. as a major problem. And 63% say too little attention is paid to race and racial issues concerning Asian Americans, according to a new analysis of a multilingual, nationally representative survey of 7,006 Asian adults conducted from July 5, 2022, to Jan. 27, 2023.

For many Asian Americans, discrimination experiences are not just single events, but instead come in several often-overlapping forms. Overall, the survey showed that most Asian Americans experience discrimination in three broad ways: Those related to being treated as a foreigner (even if they were born in the U.S.); being seen as a model minority; and other discrimination incidents in day-to-day encounters or because of their race or ethnicity.

Jump to chapters on …

  • Asian Americans’ experiences with discrimination in their daily lives
  • Asian Americans and the “forever foreigner” stereotype
  • Asian Americans and the “model minority” stereotype
  • Asian Americans and discrimination during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Asian Americans’ views of anti-Asian discrimination in the U.S. today
  • 78% of Asian adults have been treated as a foreigner in some way, even if they are U.S. born. This includes Asian adults who say that in day-to-day encounters with strangers in the U.S., someone has told them to go back to their home country, acted like they can’t speak English, criticized them for speaking a language other than English in public, or mispronounced their name. 5
  • 63% of Asian adults have experienced incidents where people assume they are a model minority. This includes Asian Americans who say that in day-to-day encounters with strangers in the U.S., people have assumed that they are good at math and science or that they are not creative thinkers.
  • 35% of South Asian adults say they have been held back at a security checkpoint for a secondary screening because of their race or ethnicity. This is higher than the shares among Southeast (15%) and East (14%) Asian adults. 6 Additionally, Asian American Muslims are more likely than some other major religious groups to say this has happened to them.
  • 32% of Asian adults say they know another Asian person in the U.S. who has been threatened or attacked because of their race or ethnicity since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic . Across regional origin groups, about one-third of East (36%) and Southeast (33%) Asian adults say they know someone with this experience, as do 24% of South Asian adults.
  • In many cases, Asian adults who grew up in the U.S. are more likely than those who immigrated as adults to say they have experienced discrimination incidents. For example, about half or more of U.S.-born Asian adults and immigrants who came to the U.S. as children (1.5 generation) say they have been called offensive names in daily interactions with strangers, compared with 20% of those who immigrated as adults (first generation). 7 This could be for a number of reasons, including recognizing discrimination more than other Asian adults, having more non-Asian friends, or being racialized in America during adolescence. 8
  • 68% of Asian adults who grew up in the U.S. say they rarely or never talked with family about the challenges they might face because of their race or ethnicity when growing up. 9 Meanwhile, 31% say their family sometimes or often discussed it.

In sum, the survey asked Asian Americans if they have personally experienced 17 specific discrimination incidents in day-to-day encounters or because of their race or ethnicity. It also asked more broadly if they have ever experienced racial discrimination.

  • About nine-in-ten Asian Americans have personally experienced at least one of the 17 discrimination incidents asked about in the survey. Across these incidents, Asian Americans are most likely to say that strangers mispronounced their name (68%) or assumed that they are good at math and science (58%). And about half of Asian adults say they have experienced four incidents or more.
  • 58% of Asian adults say they have ever experienced racial discrimination or been treated unfairly because of their race or ethnicity. This includes 53% who say they experience racial discrimination from time to time and 5% who say they experience it regularly.

Read the Appendix for the list of the 17 discrimination incidents asked about in the survey. This is not an exhaustive list of all possible discrimination experiences. Some Asian adults who said “no” to all of these may still have experienced some form of discrimination not captured by the survey.

Many Asian Americans face the experience of being treated as a foreigner, no matter their birthplace, citizenship status or strength of their ties to the U.S.

A dot plot showing that U.S.-born Asians are about as likely as foreign-born Asians to be treated as a foreigner in their day-to-day encounters with strangers in the U.S. The chart shows the shares of Asian adults, by nativity, who say people mispronounced their names, people acted as if they don't speak English, someone said that they should go back to their home country, and they were criticized for speaking a language other than English in public. Overall, 74% U.S.-born Asians and 80% foreign-born Asians have experienced at least one of the four incidents.

About equal shares of U.S.-born and immigrant Asian adults say they have had experiences in which they are treated as foreigners:

  • 70% of immigrants and 62% of U.S.-born Asian adults say people have mispronounced their name.
  • 41% of immigrants and 34% of U.S.-born adults say people have acted as if they don’t speak English.
  • 31% of immigrants and 35% of U.S.-born adults say someone has told them to go back to their home country.
  • And among those who can speak their Asian origin language, 22% of immigrants and 19% of U.S.-born adults say someone has criticized them for speaking a non-English language in public.

These experiences persist even among Asian adults whose families have lived in the U.S. for multiple generations .

  • 37% of second-generation Asian adults (the U.S.-born children of immigrant parents) say someone has told them to go back to their home country, compared with 26% of first-generation Asian adults (those who immigrated to the U.S. as adults).

Whether or not immigrants are naturalized U.S. citizens , many still experience being treated as a foreigner. And in some cases, higher shares of citizens than noncitizens say these incidents have happened to them:

  • 34% of Asian immigrants who are naturalized U.S. citizens say someone has told them to go back to their home country, compared with 26% of Asian immigrants who have not obtained citizenship. 

(Explore more about the “forever foreigner” stereotype and Asian Americans in Chapter 2 .)

Another experience many Asian Americans encounter is being stereotyped as a model minority, no matter their background. This stereotype often does not align with the lived experiences and socioeconomic backgrounds of many Asians in the U.S. Research on the model minority myth has also pointed to its negative impact on attitudes and expectations made of other racial and ethnic groups. 10

A bar chart with showing Asian adults' experiences with the model minority stereotype. The bar chart shows that 58% of Asian adults say that people have assumed they are good at math and science in their day-to-day encounters with strangers. About 22% of Asians say people have assumed they are not a creative thinker. At the same time, less than half of Asian adults (44%) have heard the term "model minority."

  • Immigrant generation: About three-quarters each of 1.5- and second-generation Asian adults say they have had at least one experience in which people have assumed they are good at math and science or not a creative thinker. Smaller shares of first-generation (56%) and third- or higher-generation (55%) Asian adults say the same.
  • Education: 72% of Asians with a postgraduate degree say they have been subjected to at least one of the model minority stereotypes, compared with 54% of those with a high school degree or less.
  • Income: 73% of Asian adults with a family income of $150,000 or more say this has happened to them, compared with 51% of Asian adults with a family income of less than $30,000.

Asian Americans’ awareness of the term ‘model minority’

Despite most Asian Americans saying they have been subjected to stereotypes associated with the idea of being a model minority, fewer than half (44%) say they have heard of the term. The groups who have experienced model minority stereotypes are also more likely to say they are familiar with the term:

  • Experiences of the stereotype: Overall, Asian adults who have experienced at least one model minority stereotype are more likely to be familiar with the label, compared with those who have not faced either of these experiences (51% vs. 32%).
  • Immigrant generation: About six-in-ten Asian adults who are 1.5 generation (60%) and second generation (62%) say they have heard of the term. By comparison, 40% of third- or higher-generation and 32% of first-generation Asian adults say the same.
  • Education: 53% of Asian Americans with a postgraduate degree know the term “model minority,” compared with 30% of those with a high school degree or less.
  • Income: 54% of Asian adults who make $150,000 or more say they are familiar with the term, compared with 29% of those who make less than $30,000.
  • Age: 56% of Asian adults younger than 30 have heard the term “model minority.” About 37% of those 65 and older say the same.

Asian Americans’ views of the ‘model minority’ label

Among Asian adults who have heard of the term “model minority,” 42% say describing Asians as a model minority is a bad thing, while 28% say it is neither a good nor bad thing, 17% say it is a good thing and 12% are not sure.

A pie chart showing that among Asian adults who have heard of the "model minority" term, 42% say it is a bad thing, 28% say it is neither good nor bad, and 17% say it is a good thing. Additionally, 12% are not sure.

Views among Asian adults who have heard of the model minority label vary across some demographic groups:

  • Immigrant generation: 62% of second-generation Asian adults say the model minority label is a bad thing. By comparison, 43% of 1.5-generation and 26% of first-generation Asian adults say the same.
  • Age: 66% of Asian adults under 30 view the model minority label negatively, while 8% view it positively. On the other hand, 36% of Asian adults 65 and older say the label is a good thing, while 17% say it is a bad thing.
  • Party: 52% of Asian adults who identify with or lean toward the Democratic Party say describing Asians as a model minority is a bad thing, compared with 17% of Republicans and Republican leaners. Among Republicans, 31% say calling Asian Americans a model minority is a good thing, while only 12% of Democrats say the same.

(Explore more about the “model minority” stereotype and Asian Americans’ views of it in Chapter 3 .)

  • 40% of Asian adults say they have received poorer service than other people at restaurants and stores. More than four-in-ten Asian adults who have a bachelor’s degree or more say they have had this experience, compared with about one-third with some college experience or less.
  • 37% of Asian adults say in day-to-day encounters with strangers, they have been called offensive names. About six-in-ten U.S.-born Asian adults (57%) say this, compared with 30% of Asian immigrants.
  • 11% of Asian adults say have been stopped, searched or questioned by the police because of their race or ethnicity. Responses differ by how others perceive their racial or ethnic identity. Asian adults who are perceived as non-Asian and non-White (which includes those who say they are perceived as “mixed race or multiracial” or “Arab or Middle Eastern,” among others) are more likely to say they have had this experience, compared with those who are perceived as Asian or Chinese. 11

In 2021, Pew Research Center conducted 66 focus groups of Asian Americans across 18 different Asian origin groups. In the focus groups, some participants shared their experiences with discrimination that elaborate on our survey findings.

  • Many participants talked about their experiences being bullied, harassed or called slurs and other offensive names because of their race or ethnicity. (Read more about these experiences in Chapter 1 )
  • Some participants – particularly those who are South Asian – talked about facing discriminatory backlash after the events of Sept. 11, 2001 . ( Chapter 1 )
  • We also asked participants what they would do if their close friend was told that they don’t belong here and to go back to their “home country.” Participants offered a range of responses including offering emotional support, telling them to walk away, record and report the incident, and speak up or fight back. ( Chapter 2 )
  • Participants also shared their perspectives on the model minority stereotype . Some shared how it reinforces harmful social pressures and treats Asians as monolithic. Others had more mixed feelings, and some had positive impressions of how the stereotype characterizes Asian Americans. ( Chapter 3 )
  • Participants discussed their experiences of being discriminated against since the coronavirus outbreak in 2020 , including being shamed, harassed or attacked in public and private spaces. ( Chapter 4 )

From exclusion through World War II

Asian Americans have faced discrimination throughout their history in the United States. In the 1800s, Asians were brought to the U.S. as indentured laborers amid the emancipation of African slaves . While playing integral roles in projects like the Transcontinental Railroad , Asian immigrants faced emerging anti-Asian sentiments and exclusion , with beliefs that Asians were creating unjust labor competition and endangering mainstream American society. Congress passed laws to exclude Asian immigrants including the 1875 Page Law , the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and the 1917 Asiatic Barred Zone Act , among others.

In the 1920s, a series of Supreme Court cases reaffirmed previous laws that clarified that Asian immigrants, including South Asians , are not “free White persons” and therefore were excluded from becoming naturalized U.S. citizens. This period also saw legislation that outlawed interracial marriage, including the 1922 Cable Act which stipulated that if U.S.-born women married “aliens ineligible for citizenship,” they would lose their own citizenship. Additionally, beginning in 1913, some states restricted Asian immigrants as well as U.S.-born Asian Americans from the right to own and lease land . Many states upheld these laws until the 1950s, and Florida’s law was only repealed in 2018 .

Beginning in 1942, Japanese Americans were incarcerated during World War II, driven by the belief that they were spies and enemies . Throughout this period, Asians experienced discrimination in the labor market and other areas of life and were treated as foreign people who were not accepted as American.

From post-World War II to the present day

In the postwar period, immigration patterns changed. The 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act abolished quotas and allowed immigration from Asia to increase . The Vietnam War and other conflicts in Southeast Asia brought refugees from the region to the U.S. in higher numbers. And the 1990 Immigration Act raised immigration ceilings and allowed the flow of Asian immigrants in professional occupations to expand.

In this period, other stereotypes about Asian Americans began to emerge. Starting from the 1960s, Asian Americans were portrayed in popular media as overachievers, intellectually and financially successful, and a group that rarely complained or spoke up. Amid the Civil Rights Movement, images of Asian Americans as a successful or “model” minority , especially in comparison with other racial or ethnic groups, proliferated. Two high-profile examples of this include the 1966 New York Times Magazine article calling Japanese Americans a “success story” and the 1987 Time magazine cover story characterizing Asian Americans as “whiz kids.”

Global tensions regularly shaped the experiences of the U.S. Asian population. The fear of economic competition with Asian countries in the postwar period contributed to rising resentment toward Asian Americans and resulted in tragedies such as the murder of Vincent Chin . In the aftermath of Sept. 11 , Muslims, Sikhs, Arabs and South Asians in the U.S. became targets of racial profiling and hate crimes due to anti-Muslim sentiments. Most recently, the COVID-19 pandemic intensified anti-Asian sentiment , with many Asian Americans facing racist attacks, threats and bias across the country.

  • For more on the spike in anti-Asian discrimination incidents following the coronavirus outbreak in 2020, refer to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 2023, “ The Federal Response to Anti-Asian Racism in the United States ”; and the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University San Bernadino, 2021, “ Report to the Nation: Anti-Asian Prejudice and Hate Crime .” ↩
  • Refer to previous Pew Research Center surveys of English-speaking Asian adults on Asian Americans’ concerns about being threatened or attacked following the coronavirus outbreak and whether it impacted their daily routines . ↩
  • Previous research has explored how describing Asian Americans as a model minority stereotypes them, as well as how it functions in the American racial context and assimilating minorities into mainstream U.S. society. For more, refer to Wu, E.D. 2013. “ The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority .” ↩
  • For more information about model minority stereotypes, refer to Lu, J.G. 2023. “ A Creativity Stereotype Perspective on the Bamboo Ceiling: Low Perceived Creativity Explains the Underrepresentation of East Asian Leaders in the United States .” Journal of Applied Psychology . ↩
  • While name mispronunciation may not always be experienced as discrimination, names are strong indicators of other aspects of identity, and having one’s name mispronounced can have profound interpersonal and institutional impacts. Additionally, a common experience among Asian Americans with “difficult-to-pronounce” names is adopting an “easy-to-pronounce” or Anglicized version of their name in response to social pressure. For more, refer to Laham, S.M., P. Koval and A.L. Alter, 2012 “ The Name-Pronunciation Effect: Why People like Mr. Smith More than Mr. Colquhoun ,” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology; and Zhao, X. and M. Biernat, 2017, “ ‘Welcome to the U.S.’ but ‘Change your Name’? Adopting Anglo Names and Discrimination ,” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. ↩
  • Regional Asian origin groups include those who self-identify with an Asian ethnic origin group or multiple Asian ethnic origin groups that belong to one Asian region only. East Asian adults include those who identify as Chinese, Japanese, Korean or some other East Asian origin. South Asian adults include those who identify as Bangladeshi, Indian, Nepali, Pakistani or some other South Asian origin. Southeast Asian adults include those who identify as Cambodian, Filipino, Hmong, Vietnamese or some other Southeast Asian origin. ↩
  • In this report, Asian immigrants who are “first generation” – those who came to the U.S. when they were 18 or older – and “1.5 generation” – those who came to the U.S. when they were younger than 18 – are treated as two separate groups. This differs from other Pew Research Center analyses that categorize all immigrants, regardless of the age at which they came to the U.S., as “first generation.” The distinction between “first generation” and “1.5 generation” in this report follows previous research that explores how age and life stage for foreign born, and parental nativity for U.S. born, impact and complicate the meaning and measurement of generational labels. For more, refer to Rumbaut, R.G. 2004. “ Ages, Life Stages, and Generational Cohorts: Decomposing the Immigrant First and Second Generations in the United States .” International Migration Review. ↩
  • Previous research suggests that birthplace, age at immigration, and length of residence in the U.S. are linked to perceptions of discrimination. Those who were born in the U.S., immigrated at a younger age, and have resided in the U.S. for longer periods are more likely to perceive discrimination than their counterparts. For more, refer to Brondolo, E., R. Rahim, S. Grimaldi, A. Ashraf, N. Bui and J. Schwartz, 2015, “ Place of Birth Effects on Self-Reported Discrimination: Variations by Type of Discrimination ,” International Journal of Intercultural Relations; and Wong, J. and K. Ramakrishnan, 2021, “ Anti-Asian Hate Incidents and the Broader Landscape of Racial Bias ,” AAPI Data. Additionally, according to the same Pew Research Center survey, U.S.-born Asian adults are less likely than Asian immigrants to say that all or most of their friends in the U.S. are Asian . ↩
  • “Asian adults who grew up in the U.S.” are those who were born in the U.S. and those who were born abroad but immigrated to the U.S. before they were 18 (that is, those who are 1.5 generation and all U.S.-born adults). Because this question asks whether Asian adults talked with their families about the challenges they might face because of their race or ethnicity when growing up, analysis is limited only to those who grew up in the U.S. to provide a consistent base for the racial context in which the respondent grew up. ↩
  • Some scholars argue that the model minority stereotype of Asian Americans is used as an instrument to discipline other racial and ethnic groups and to undermine their political demands. For more on this, see Wu, E.D., 2013, “ The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority ”; and Poon, O, D. Squire, C. Kodama, A. Byrd, J. Chan, L. Manzano, S. Furr, and D. Bishundat, 2016, “ A Critical Review of the Model Minority Myth in Selected Literature on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Higher Education ,” Review of Educational Research. ↩
  • In the same survey, we asked Asian adults how most people would describe them if, for example, they walked past them on the street – that is, how others perceive their racial or ethnic identity. About 60% of Asian adults say they are perceived as “Asian,” 12% say they are perceived as “Chinese,” 5% say they are perceived as “Hispanic or Latino,” 3% say they are perceived as “White,” and 18% say they are perceived as some other non-White and non-Asian race or ethnicity. Asian adults who say they are perceived as a non-White and non-Asian race or ethnicity include those who say most people would describe them as mixed race or multiracial, Arab or Middle Eastern, Native American or an Indigenous person, African American or Black, or some other race or ethnicity. Throughout this report, data for Asian adults who are perceived as White is not shown separately due to insufficient sample size. ↩

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153 US History Topics [2024 US History Essay Ideas]

American history is not as long as the European one. However, it’s one of the richest histories in the world. It’s full of controversies, different opinions, and interesting facts. Those who study American history will find how many voices, perspectives, and points of view can coexist.

When writing an essay about America, you should try to stay as objective as possible. Think creatively and consider historical events from a new perspective.

This abundance of information and events can intimidate anyone. That’s why it can be very challenging to select one single US history topic to write about. There are so many!

To decide on it, students should answer several questions:

  • What time period interests me the most?
  • What specific event sounds the most appealing to me?
  • What historical figure impresses me?

It is indeed a daunting task to attempt to put the remarkable story of the US into an essay list. Fortunately, we’re not trying to do so.

Tired of researching historical encyclopedias? This is the perfect article for you – read through this collection of 153 US history essay topics prepared by our team .

🌎Top 10 American History Topics to Write about

  • 🏗️ Topics before 1877
  • 🌻 Topics: 1878-1899
  • 🏙️ US Topics: 1900s

🧊 Cool American History Topics

  • 🧐 US Regents Topics
  • ✊ Black History Topics

🎉 Fun US History Essay Topics

👌 easy american history essay topics, ❓ us history essay questions, 📋 how to cite an american history essay.

  • The 20th Century.
  • America’s Role in Normandy Landings.
  • Conquest of California.
  • The Great Depression.
  • USA: Colonial History.
  • The Oregon Trail.
  • African American Slave Trade.
  • Who was Harriet Tubman?
  • America in the Modern World.
  • Klondike Gold Rush.

☝️ Good US History Topics by Period

This is the IvyPanda list of American history topics that can help students get inspired!

We divided the history into epochs and organized the US history essay topics accordingly. Besides, this US history topics list structured thematically. It, hopefully, will make it easier to navigate and get started.

One of the best ways to look at history is to examine it from a chronological perspective. The topics in this section are structured based on the time period.

Every period is filled with key events and figures. American society is the product of those events—it’s vital to have a closer look at it.

🏗️ History Topics before 1877

  • America before Columbus . In this topic, you can talk about the first people in the Americas and what historians know about them. There are a lot of archeological findings and artifacts that survived thousands of years. Write about Christopher Columbus and how “the discovery” was not a discovery. The Americas have been inhabited and had developed civilizations long before Europeans put their foot there.
  • The first landing of Christopher Columbus and the New World

These ideas are for essays and research papers.

  • Christopher Columbus: Biography, Discoveries, Contributions . You can talk about Christopher Columbus and his biography. Track how his image has been changing throughout history. Modern historians see him as a person who contributed to the genocide of Native Americans. What is your opinion about him?
  • The British Rule in the Americas and the first British Settlements. Explore the first permanent colony in North America and what English wanted the colonies to be. There were a lot of obstacles, which first settlers had faced before Jamestown became a prosperous city. They suffered from a shortage of food, severe climate conditions, and disease. Plus, there were problems with the Indians. Research what “the middle ground” was and why this concept is relevant to this topic.
  • What is Puritanism?
  • Puritans in Great Britain
  • The Puritan Ethic in the United States . Who the Puritans were? Why were they sent to the New World? What were their religious beliefs? Explore the influence puritans had in the past. Is puritanism still relevant in the US today?
  • The Effects of the Spanish Rule and The Conquistadors in the Americas. Spanish Colonization of the Americas laid foundations for the Latin American identity. It is also considered the very first mass genocide in the world. It is indeed a matter of perspective. You can talk about how the contact between the Native Americans and the Spaniards affected both parties.
  • The Protestant Reformation and its influence on the US History. Religion was one of the main reasons why the first settlers decided to travel to the New World. Write about the connection between the freedom of religion in the US. What influence did it have on the nation as a whole in the future? Why is it crucial? How did it affect the lifestyle of people in the US?
  • Native Americans and “the Middle Ground” . Not everyone knows that the famous Disney cartoon Pocahontas is based on the true story. If this story was told by a Native American, it would be different. In this essay, you can comment on the role that Native Americans played in the European Colonization. Elaborate on the disappearance of “the Middle Ground.”
  • The beginning of slavery in British America and the Middle Passage. You can analyze the way this institution was established. Write about the factors that influenced it in the 17th century, try to include first-person accounts of slavery. Use the American Slave Narrative , for instance, Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa . This inclusion will demonstrate how inhumane slavery was and will open a good discussion.
  • Christianity, slavery, and colonialism in the US
  • The witchcraft trials . Elaborate on religious views of the New England public. How such views made it possible for more than 200 people to be accused of witchcraft. Discuss a Puritan code, the structure of the society, and what type of women were prosecuted.

Salem was an epicenter of the witchcraft trials in the US.

  • The Boston Tea Party as the key event of the American Revolution. The Boston Tea Party is a highly celebrated event in the history of the US. Discuss why is that? Why is it so important for the Americans? Talk about the birth of patriotism, resistance and the revolt against colonialism. What did the rebels mean by “taxation without representation?”
  • The American Revolutionary War and the Declaration of Independence. This topic is one of the most popular in the history of the United States. First, you could write about a military battle with Great Britain and the reasons for it. Second, talk about political battles within the US at that period. Examine the establishment of the new nation.
  • How the Revolutionary war changes American Society
  • Why was the Declaration of Independence written?
  • Was the American Revolution really revolutionary?
  • The meaning of the Constitution. This is one of the most fruitful and fascinating debates in US history. Some people argue that it is written in a very vague way to allow American society to evolve. Others say that its text allows minorities to be deprived of the very things it promises to establish. Elaborate if you find the Constitution to be a liberal, radical, or a conservative document.
  • Why the Bill of Rights was added to the Constitution. Talk about the first 10 amendments to the Constitution and explore why these amendments are so important. What did the amendments guarantee? Why was The Bill of Rights added to the Constitution in the first place?

James Madison wrote the amendments in response to calls from several states for greater constitutional protection for individual liberties.

  • The Founding Fathers’ influence on the US. The Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence are sacred documents. The Founding Fathers are major figures for the Americans as well. Writing about the influence of the Founding Fathers, select one or two members to focus on. Consider the diversity among the members. How did it help the Founding Fathers in leading the war and framing a sustainable government?
  • What is the role of the Founding Fathers in American society and religion?
  • European Colonization influence on the Native American population
  • Removal of Indian tribes. American History is unjust at times. Explore how unconstitutional the treatment of Indian Americans was and why they find it this way. Look at the way the Founding Fathers addressed this issue. Examining the Indian Removal Act of 1830 will allow you to fully develop this topic. Analyze why the policy was accepted in the first place. Why is it called “ethnic cleansing” by the majority of historians nowadays?
  • Native Americans lost their freedom
  • The impact of railroads in America. The rapid expansion of America would be impossible without the railroad construction. The railroads triggered the development of the Midwest and the West. Despite that, the construction of the railroads was highly monopolistic and undemocratic. Comment on the richest men in the US – John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, and Cornelius Vanderbilt.
  • The role of cotton in the American economy. The American Economy in the 19th century heavily depended on cotton production. There was even a saying “Cotton is King” that was very popular at that time. Besides cotton, it heavily depended on the slaves. This period in American History is called the Antebellum Era. Look at the role of cotton from several perspectives. How profitable was it? How did slaves contribute to the American economy? How financially unviable was the abolition of slavery?

he cotton plantation is “the Second Middle Passage.

  • History of American Transcendentalism.
  • Why was Transcendentalism important for American Culture? The essay can start with a broad explanation of what transcendentalism is. Explain where it started and how it evolved. Explore what views the group had on women’s rights, slavery, education, government, and religion. You could write about the most prominent transcendentalists – Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry Thoreau.
  • Religions in the 19th Century America. Known as the Second Great Awakening or Christian Revivalism, religion in the 19th century America was altered. Look back at the beginning of the American Revolution. Anglicans, Methodists, and Quackers were the fastest-growing religious groups then. Discuss all of them.
  • The abolition of slavery and the Civil War . A lot of historians believe that slavery in itself did not cause the conflict. In this essay, you could elaborate on this idea and consider the other point of view. For a long essay, write about Abraham Lincoln’s thoughts on slavery. His ideas about slavery and racial inequality were one of the most discussed aspects of his entire life. Look at his letters and write about the complexity of his views.
  • The causes of the Civil War and the aftermath of war. This essay is one of the easiest American history essays to write. Talk about the causes and effects of the Civil War (1861-1865) in the US. Why did it happen? What was achieved?
  • The struggle over the goal and the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment . You can elaborate on the goal of the amendment. Was it able to protect the rights of black citizens? Why was it still possible for the states to deny them their right to vote?
  • How did Reconstruction change the United States after the Civil war?
  • The Reconstruction governments. What type of reforms did the reconstruction government implement? What positive reforms happened during the Reconstruction Era? You could discuss radical reconstruction and white supremacy that spawned during the Reconstruction period. Elaborate on the idea of manifest destiny. Why was it so popular in the 19th century in the US?
  • The Compromise of 1850 . Why was reaching the compromise necessary? You can describe the terms of the compromise. Explain what results were achieved: political, economic, and cultural.

🌻 American History 1878-1899

The United States was going through many changes during this period: from various social changes and changes in foreign and domestic policies to rapid economic and cultural changes. This time saw the country changing for the best in some aspects and for the worst in others.

  • Industrialization after the Civil war. Industrialization of the United States was going on for almost half a century. However, the most impressive growth happened in 1880-1900. The expansion of the steel, iron and oil industries drove the American economy. Comment on all the inventions, technological advancements that happened in the US at that time.
  • Immigrants and their ideas of the American Dream
  • Social reforms during the Progressive Era
  • American Foreign Policy in the 1890s

George Washington's quote from his Farewell Address to the American people.

  • The importance of the Progressive Era reforms
  • Race relations during the Progressive Era reforms
  • Japanese Americans Immigration in the 19th century

🏙️ 20th Century US History Topics

The 20th century for the United States and the world, in general, was highly eventful. Economic crises, two World Wars, the Cold War, and the fight over civil rights. Plus, a huge economic and technological upheaval, the space program.

This list of American History topics after 1900 can be great for those looking for inspiration for a paper.

Here you go:

  • The door to America— Ellis Island. What are America’s best features? Economic opportunities, political and religious freedom? An abundance of jobs and opportunities? Land and natural resources? All of these made the United States experience the migration flux from all over the world. Elaborate on how Ellis island is a symbol of American immigration and the American dream.

Many immigrants entered the US through Ellis Island

  • The rise of capitalism
  • Work environments during the Progressive Era
  • Women’s suffrage movement in America
  • The causes and effects of women’s suffrage movement in the US
  • Changes in American Government after WWI
  • Is prohibition to blame for the organized crime in The United States?
  • The economic impact of the Great Depression. The Great Depression is one of the longest economic downturns in the history of the United States. You can talk about several main causes of the crisis. Another good approach would be to analyze the way American presidents handled this crisis.
  • Japanese American discrimination during the Great Depression
  • How did Roosevelt plan to end the Great Depression?
  • The Great Depression and what is the new deal?
  • The Role of the United States during World War 2
  • Why did the United States fight and lose the Vietnam War?
  • The war in Vietnam and the Civil Rights Movement
  • A Comparison of the traditional and the revisionist arguments regarding the Origins of The Cold War
  • The Cold War and US diplomacy
  • The Cold War and how it influenced American society

History is tough, but some significant historical events take our breath away even centuries later. Here is our list of cool American history topics. Even if you don’t find any topic that works for you, it can inspire you to look for moments in history that appeal to you personally.

  • The true Story of Pocahontas: An untold story of a Native American girl. The true story of Pocahontas is covered with myths. Critically examine the story of her life and death. Try to understand it from a standpoint of a 12 years old Native American girl kidnapped by a white colonizer.
  • Native American tribes in the US History
  • What was discussed at the Constitutional Convention?
  • The history of the Statue of Liberty
  • Henry Ford and how his inventions changed America
  • Moon landing conspiracy
  • The war on drugs in US History
  • Illegal immigrants in the US
  • The American sense of humor
  • American pop culture in the 1920s . This time period is called “the roaring twenties.” It was filled with drastic political and cultural changes in the United States. Jazz, flapper culture, prohibition, and economic abundance are important elements of the 1920s.

The 20s were“roaring” due to the popular culture of the decade.

  • The history of gangs in the US
  • What did hippies believe in?
  • History of Hippie’s Culture
  • Presidential assassinations in the United States History. Abraham Lincoln, James Garfield, William McKinley, and JFK were the only US Presidents murdered while in office. You don’t have to retell the stories of their deaths! Instead, explore how these assassinations triggered some vital political reforms.
  • The history of the Fifth Amendment

🙌 Most Interesting American History Topics

Use the following list of most interesting US History topics for your next essay. Choose what US history interesting event or a historic figure captures your attention the most.

🧐 US History Regent Topics

  • The Relationships Between Federal and State Governments
  • Was there a need to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki?
  • The Cold War: Origins, Causes, Phases, and the Results
  • Why and How the Cold War Was Fought
  • The US Army in the Iraq War
  • The Iraq War: Background and Issues
  • Why did the Iraq War go against the plan?
  • Executive Orders and Presidential Power in the United States
  • History of the American Constitution
  • The Turning points of the American Revolution

The Battle of Saratoga was a key turning point of the Revolutionary War.

✊ Black History Essay Topics

Studying the history of the United States without studying slavery is impossible, mainly because the issue of race is ingrained into the DNA of America.

Black African American history allows students to get a different perspective on the same events. It lets them hear the voices that are so often erased from the history books. These African American history essays can help anyone looking for a good topic to write about.

  • Slave Resistance in the Eighteen Century. Continuously throughout history, African American slaves were portrayed as voiceless and victimized. Others presented them as almost indifferent and passive to their own destiny. You can examine a different perspective, an Afrocentric one. The history of slavery was not the history of passivity, it was a history of black resistance.
  • African American Music as a Form of Resistance
  • African American Religion and Spirituality in the United States
  • The 13th Amendment and the End of Slavery
  • The Jim Crow Laws in the United States History . Jim Crow Laws were the laws that enforced racial segregation in the country. Dedicate an introduction to discuss where the name “Jim Crow” comes from. Give a historical background to how the laws were used. This topic can make a strong essay because no one can stay indifferent.
  • Gender and Jim Crow
  • The Role of Martin Luther King, Jr in The Civil Right Movement
  • Martin Luther King’s speech “I have a dream”
  • Brown vs The Board of Education . The ruling in Brown vs. The Board of Education was one of the most fundamental changes in the US educational system. How did the general public receive the news about the desegregation of public schools? How did the American educational system change after this case?
  • The Significance of the Harlem Renaissance
  • Barack Obama: The First African American President
  • Barack Obama’s healthcare reforms
  • Has Obama’s Presidency changed America?

Obama prevented a few crises in the US.

  • The Cowboy Culture in the US
  • How Did Yellow Journalism Start?
  • Why is Superman the most American of all the heroes?
  • The History of American Flag
  • History of Sports in the United States
  • History of Thanksgiving Turkey in the United States
  • How Did Highways Change the United States of America?
  • American History through Hollywood Film

Sometimes you simply do not have enough time to write a profound essay. These American history topics are relatively easy, and you don’t have to research them a lot. Even if you do, there is a ton of information available.

  • British Colonization of the Americas
  • Slavery and racism in the United States
  • The Puritans Influence on the American Society
  • The pilgrims and the puritans
  • The Causes of the Vietnam War
  • Why Was Martin Luter King Assassinated?
  • American Moon Landing
  • What Are Major Events in the US History?
  • What Started the US History?
  • What Is the Most Important Piece of the US History?
  • What Is the US History Summary?
  • What City Was the First Capital in the US History?
  • What Was the First American State in the US History?
  • What Are Some Controversies in the US History?
  • How Far Was the New Deal a Turning Point in the US History up to 1941?
  • How the Airplane Industry Changed US History?
  • What Was President Reagan Known For in the US History?
  • How Reagan’s Ideology Shaped the US History?
  • Why Is the Reagan Revolution in the US History?
  • How Richard Nixon Influenced the US History?
  • What Vietnam War Showed About US History?
  • Did the Concept of Imperialism Exist in the US History?
  • Why Did the Wars in the Middle East Go Down in the US History as Unnecessary?
  • What Is the Most Popular Ideology in the US History?
  • How Does the US History Describe George W. Bush?
  • How Did the Use of Nuclear Weapons in Japan Affect the US History?
  • What Are Some Horrible and Forgotten Events in the US History?
  • Is Donald Trump the Second Worst President in the US History?
  • What Was the Biggest Political Miscalculation in the US History?
  • Who Is the Most Overrated First Lady in the US History?
  • How Well Do US History Teachers Really Know About the US History?
  • Who Was the Wimpiest President in the US History?
  • Who Are Some of the Great Asian Americans in the US History?
  • What Was the Most Corrupt Time in the US History?
  • What Was the Bloodiest Single Day Battle in the US History?
  • Who Is the Greatest Hero in the US History?
  • How Did King Philip’s War Change the US History?

Your citation will depend on the type of requirements your instructor will provide you with. You can ask your teacher which style of citation is preferable before the essay writing. The school itself may have specific guidelines for every typeof academic writing.

Chicago, MLA, APA are the main styles of citation in academic writing.

For history essays, there are two key methods of referencing both primary and secondary sources:

  • In-text citation. In this method, you mention the author and the year in the body of the essay. The list of references is placed at the end of the essay.
  • Footnote Referencing. In this method, you put a number in the body. It corresponds with the reference at the bottom of each page. At the end of the essay, a list of works read rather than cited should be included.

All the citation entries should be listed in alphabetical order. If you mention the same author multiple times with different works, use chronological order.

Keeping track of all the sources, both read and cited, is time-consuming. For that, students can try to use different online software systems. These systems can help arrange the list alphabetically and correctly organize all the citations.

Reference list

These digital tools are worth checking out:

Thank you for reading so far! Now you’re ready to start an amazing paper on US history. Share this article with those who may find it helpful, and leave a comment below.

🔗 References

  • U.S. History and Historical Documents: USAGov, the Official Guide to Government Information and Services.
  • All Topics: National Museum of American History.
  • TIMELINE, United States History: World Digital Library.
  • How Do I Cite Sources: Plagiarism.org.
  • Citing Primary Sources, Chicago: Teacher Resources, Library of Congress.
  • Black History, Topical: National Archives.
  • Black History Month: National Geographic Society.
  • College Writing: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • Writing Historical Essays, A Guide for Undergraduates: Department of History, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.
  • Writing an Essay Introduction: Research & Learning Online.
  • Research and Citation Resources: Purdue Writing Lab, College of Liberal Art.
  • Citing Your Sources, Citing Basics: Research Guides at Williams College Libraries.
  • Citing Electronic Sources: Academic Integrity at MIT, a Handbok for Students.
  • Generate Topic Ideas Quickly and Easily: Online Research Library Questia.
  • Chicago (A-D)
  • Chicago (N-B)

IvyPanda. (2024, March 12). 153 US History Topics [2024 US History Essay Ideas]. https://ivypanda.com/essays/topic/us-history-essay-topics/

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